Sprint doubled my tablet bill – what should I do?

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Why are Boris Kontsevich’s Sprint bills suddenly higher? You probably won’t like the answer — or how his wireless company tries to “fix” his problem.

Question: I have had an account with Sprint for almost a year now. It’s a tablet plan for 2 GB of data for $15 per month.

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Last month, my bill came to $30 for no reason. I had no overages or anything of the sort. I literally spent hours with someone from customer support before they could fix it.

And the bills kept coming. Every month, I was charged $30 instead of $15. So I sent a written complaint to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

Sprint replied to FCC, claiming it informed me in February about a new $7.99 fee and that I could cancel my account by May 1 without incurring any early termination fees. I have automatic payments set up, so I never saw the bill message in February, and who is really looking at those, anyway?

I did look at the copy of the bill and there is something in there about the fee, but it says absolutely nothing about closing the account without being charged an early termination fee.

My calls and emails to Sprint executives are not being answered. What should I do? — Boris Kontsevich, Manalapan, NJ

Answer: Sprint should have clearly disclosed the new fee and told you about your options. In its view — and in mine — it fulfilled that obligation when it sent you a text message and included a warning on your March wireless bill.

Now, that doesn’t make what Sprint did right. Not by a long shot.

According to the FCC rebuttal by Sprint, the charge is a $7.99 Spending Limit Program Charge, which can be avoided if you participate in Sprint’s eBill program. It doesn’t really explain the fee; nor does it really have to.

But Sprint also admits that it charged you the fee “in error” because you were already enrolled in eBill. It said it had made the adjustments after you contacted it. (That still leaves about $7 a month unaccounted for, which is a mystery.)

No question about it, the “Spending Limit” fee is just another in a long list of irritating junk fees that line the pockets of many American businesses. Cellular companies are notorious purveyors of junk fees, but the airline industry isn’t far behind. Fees for printing out a boarding pass come to mind, but there are others. Many others.

I don’t want to dwell on the subject for too long, but there are two ways of looking at these fees. First, customers like you are the impetus for junk fees because you’re so price sensitive that you’ll only pay $15 for your tablet plan. Or second, the endlessly inventive and underregulated wireless industry, under constant pressure from shareholders, must impose junk fees to satisfy a voracious appetite for profit.

I can’t blame customers for wanting good deals. They’ve wanted them since the beginning of time. In my view, this is just another case of a poorly-regulated industry run amok, and someone needs to rein it in.

It turns out a refund wasn’t enough for you — you also wanted to get out of your contract. In addition to the FCC, you filed a complaint with the BBB with no luck. I’m not surprised, nor am I surprised that Sprint’s executives failed to respond to your inquiries.

I contacted Sprint on your behalf. It agreed to close your account and waive the early termination fees.

Is the Spending Limit Program Charge a junk fee?

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63 thoughts on “Sprint doubled my tablet bill – what should I do?

  1. So what was the other $7 portion of the fee? What was Sprint’s explanation?

    Aside from that there are junk fees and then there’s “convenience fees”. What’s the difference? Junk fees are unavoidable, you have to pay them to obtain the product or service. A “resort fee” is a junk fee. You can stay at the property without paying the resort fee (or otherwise getting it waived). Convenience fees are “features, services or value added to products” that can be avoided by some action or performance on the consumers part. Basically, you are paying for the convenience of not jumping through a hoop.

  2. While I won’t defend Sprint’s “Spending Limit Fee” in general, I will point out that yeah, if you receive bills in the mail, you should actually read them. I’m pretty sure every company out there that sends regular bills also uses them for customer notices. And moreover, that’s pretty much always considered sufficient “notice” of any sort of change to your account. (This isn’t new nor unique to the cellular industry.)

    Pro Tip: If you get a piece of mail from pretty much any company, and it’s marked “Pre-Sort Standard”, you can safely discard it as junk mail. Standard (formerly known as “Bulk”) rate mail is not considered to constitute “notice” for legal purposes because it’s usually not forwarded if you change your address…

    If the words “First Class” appear anywhere in the postmark, you really need to open it. It may still be junk (that they paid a lot of money to deliver), but it also may be a notice legally binding to you.

  3. I agree that the LW should have read his bill. I read the description of the fee a couple of times and I am still not sure I understand just what it is there for. I would have to say that it is the definition of a junk fee.

    This is probably one of the few cases that I would get a government agency involved to review a fee.

    1. Agreed! I pulled up the Sprint site, read it four times, and still don’t get it. More importantly, I haven’t the slightest idea about how it relates to the rate that the user is signed up for ($15 in the case of the LW).

      This is it:

      http://support.sprint.com/support/pages/printTemplate.jsp?articleId=case-wh164052-20100120-111115


      Here’s some helpful information for you if you’re part of our Account Spending Limit Program. The decision to place you in the program is based on information provided to us by an outside credit service when you authorize a credit history check.

      About your spending limit

      Your Spending Limit is the monthly maximum amount of spending per
      phone on your account based on your credit decision. For accounts with
      multiple phones, the total spending limit is calculated as the number of
      phones on the account multiplied by the spending limit per phone.

      For example: If an account with 3 phones has a spending limit of $250
      per phone, the spending limit for the account will be $750 (or 3 x $250 =
      $750).

      The Spending Limit Program Charge

      A $7.99 monthly Spending Limit Program charge will be added to new
      accounts. However, we will waive that charge if you sign up for
      recurring AutoPay and eBill.

      1. So in other words, due to the results of the credit check the company thinks you might not be able to pay your bill so they charge you more? Makes perfect sense to someone somewhere.

        1. The fee is designed to offset the cost of processing payments. Basically, its a fee for NOT paying them by the cheapest most reliable method available. Autopay is MUCH cheaper and less labor intensive to process then checks, one time bank (CC) payments, or POS payments.

    2. The fee is designed to offset the cost of processing payments. Basically, its a fee for NOT paying them by the cheapest most reliable method available. Autopay is MUCH cheaper and less labor intensive to process then checks, one time bank (CC) payments, or POS payments.

      They are basically charging you for paying them by a method that has operational costs associated with it. Its like the airline charging you for paper tickets (and then mailing them).

  4. You can’t vote on this poll because the answer is both.

    It’s a nonsense fee of course, but this is a free market and you should be able to charge anything you want. Let the consumer decide if they want to do business with you.

    1. If the LW has a valid contract in effect, Sprint has no right to raise his rate. Several years ago, one of the wireless carriers (it may have been Sprint) tried to add a junk fee to existing customers’ bills. After many complaints, the FCC ruled that they either had to keep the rate the same as agreed to or release from their contract any customer who objected to paying it. Several hundred-thousand customers were able to get out of their contracts after the carrier decided not to back down from the new charges.

    2. If your locked into a contract, they seem to be able to do what they want, not you the client.
      Either it works both ways (the contract) or it should not be allowed. If a company can add/change a contract in mid stream then so should you.

      1. You’d likely be able to exit the contract without penalty if there was a substantive change to the terms, and cost/price would very likely qualify.

  5. With only three US carriers offering plans that dont require the additional purchase of phone, and with multibillion dollar barriers to entry, this is in no way a free market.

    1. Perhaps I’m misunderstanding. You aren’t require to purchase a phone from the carrier in order to use the service. You can get the phone from anywhere including second hand phones so long as its compatible.

      1. That’s really only true for unlocked GSM phones, which means Tmobile and AT&T. While there are other companies (Cricket, Metro PCS, etc) you typically have to buy compatible equipment on their network. The unlocking is the key and while its easier, its still not an ideal system. For instance the big 3 providers require a device to be provisioned on their service (meaning active) before they will unlock it, but to activate the phone with the service it needs to be unlocked to begin with.

    1. Working fine right now for me in both. Jut got an update to Firefox when I fired it up this morning, now version 34.

  6. I don’t even know what that means; “Spending limit program charge”. What really *IS* that fee?
    I have the same deal with my tablet. 3 gigs per month for $31 total. I only get data on this, nothing else. In fact, I’ve disabled texting just so I don’t accidently incur extra charges. As for voice. I have a work phone that I’ve forwarded my Google voice number to.

    1. They are basically charging you for paying them by a method that has operational costs associated with it. Its like the airline charging you for paper tickets (and then mailing them). Autopay is the cheapest and least labor intensive, if you want to pay another way it’s a flat $8 fee, which they figure will be prohibitive enough that people will use the autopay payment method.

  7. Just tell me what you’re going to charge me and how long you are going to charge me. Then I’ll decide if I want your service. There are so many junk fees and government add-on fees that it is beyond ridiculous! I’m so sick of opening my bill and there’s another government tax added to my cell phone bill. Stop with all the taxes already.

  8. I think we are talking about different things There is a robust secondary market for cell phones. Obtaining service from a company does not require that you purchase your cell phone from them. If someone gives you a cell phone that was previously used on that network you simply activate that phone with your account. It’s not like the old (very old) days when you were required to leave a phone from the phone company

    1. My apologies we were talking about different things. Sure you can by a second hand phone easily for a certain network and just use it. Second hand phones aren’t as common in Japan. Dumb phones sure, but carriers like Softbank have the IMEI and registered/paired to one customer account.

  9. I really don’t care how companies divide up the total amount I have to pay to get a product or service, I just want to know 1) what the total price is before agreeing to the transaction or contract, and 2) that the price won’t change for the duration of the agreement, if it’s a monthly service or an installment contract. If Sprint wants to charge me $0.01 per month for service and then add $29.99 in ancillary fees, as long as the price of service is advertised as $30.00 and doesn’t change, great. But somehow, it’s not against the law to advertise monthly service for $0.01 and then send me a bill for $30.00. It’s also apparently not illegal to offer me $15.00 per month service and then raise the price to $30.00 partway through the contract. In this instance, that’s underhanded because even if the LW was able to cancel his Sprint service, good luck getting that tablet to work on another carrier.

  10. Auto-pay/pre authorized withdrawals are solely a one-way street for “convenience”…if you get sick, if someone doesn’t pay YOU on time, whatever, then the company forces through the charge and YOU get dinged with bank fees, etc. If the company’s service goes down (tower falls, strike with employee sabotage)…they still pull the charge from you and you have no service, and have to fight to (maybe) get it returned via your financial institution months later. Remember: whenever the CEO of a large corporation dies, 1000 angels gain their wings and Satan mourns and sheds tears. Nothing that a “large corporation” does is ever designed with YOU being the focus. You MAY benefit, but that is only as an aside, it was never their primary intent.

  11. I couldn’t answer the poll, because it’s impossible to tell exactly what the “Spending Limit Program Charge” is. Sprint simply seems to justify the charge by saying it’s a “fee”. Perhaps Sprint’s hoping that customers will think it’s a federal or state tax of some sort, but there’s nothing in the information provided that says it is or isn’t. And there’s nothing at all about the remaining $7.00. It almost sounds like a fee imposed on a customer if the customer hasn’t signed up for an expensive enough plan. Wow! If that’s what it is, I’d insist that Sprint comply with the terms of the customer’s written service agreement (there is one, isn’t there?)
    And if that’s really what it is, of course, I’d answer “yes, it’s a junk fee.”

  12. But it only applies to those in the Spending Limit program? I mean, it’s called a Spending LImit Program Charge, not a paper bill and/or processing charge.

    1. Everyones in the spending limit program, it’s just the maximum outstanding balance for a line of service before you have to make a payment. If you have very good credit you just have a very high spending limit, not so good credit lower spending limit.

  13. I am SO GLAD that I have a Tracfone and a SkyRoam WiFi connection for my laptop. I don’t want to walk around playing with a phone, don’t want to take photos with my phone, and I have no wish to let everyone contact me whenever they feel like it. I spend $100 a year on the Tracfone and $10 per day for the SkyRoam which I can use whenever I don’t have WiFi service, like on a cruise or in Uganda.

  14. It is simple…Sprint does a credit check on their customers…those customers that have “bad” credit (i.e. not paying their bills on time; have unpaid balances; debts written off; etc) have a choice: 1) sign up for the AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives its money in a timely matter or 2) pay an additional $ 7.99 a month.

    Since most companies will carry a customer for 60 to 90 days before cutting off service, there are customers that will run up a bill and/or don’t pay their bills and go to another carrier pulling this ‘scam’.

    If customers pay their bills on time then their is no need for Sprint to charge $ 7.99 a month. Some readers will argue that Sprint should raise their prices but why should customers that pay their bills on time pay for customers…where some of them intentionally do NOT pay their bills…who don’t pay their bills on time.

  15. It does make perfect sense…

    If you go sign up for electric, water, etc., these utilities will either require a payment history with your previous utility providers or a credit report or require a deposit.

    How can Sprint collect their money if the customer stop paying and “vanishes” which can be done more easily today than ever.

    Sprint can decline customers with bad credit or ask them for a deposit or in this case, ask customers to sign up with AutoPay so that Sprint can receive their money in a timely matter.

  16. I will defend Sprint’s Spending Limit Fee…It is fair and simple…Sprint does a credit check on their customers…those customers that have “bad” credit (i.e. not paying their bills on time; have unpaid balances; debts written off; etc) have a choice: 1) sign up for the AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives its money in a timely matter or 2) pay an additional $ 7.99 a month.

    Sprint is trying to prevent themselves from getting stiffed or even ripped off. Please remember that Sprint is going to provide services and there are customers not paying for them. Some will argue that they can take the customer to small claims…the costs as well as you can’t get blood from a turnip.

    1. That makes no sense for two reasons. 1)It is applied to all customers regardless of their credit status and 2) you must sign up for ebill which is wholly unrelated to payment history.

      Besides, there are any number of ways that Sprint can ensure that it receives its money in a timely manner, not the least of which is for those customers with tarnished credit they suspend service if the bill is not paid timely.

      Additionally, autopay does not eliminate or reduce any deposit requirements.

      It should be obvious that this is a fee designed to encourage behavior which benefits Sprint’s cost structure, i.e. paper bills are expensive to generate and mail as well as autopay makes timely payment more likely.

  17. It is not a junk fee…Sprint does a credit check on their customers…those customers that have “bad” credit (i.e. not paying their bills on time; have unpaid balances; debts written off; etc) have a choice: 1) sign up for the AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives its money in a timely matter or 2) pay an additional $ 7.99 a month.

    Please remember that Sprint could decline service to customers with poor credit. Or could be like the water, electric, sewer, etc. that requires a deposit if you have poor credit. They are only asking that a customer pays their bill with AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives their money after providing a service.

    1. Except that all customers, including those with pristine credit, are subject to this fee unless they sign up for autocredit and ebill. Thus the argument fails.

    2. This has nothing to do with credit worthiness. The fee is a means of offsetting the cost of high cost payment processing for checks, POS, and onetime CC/bank card transactions. Autopay and ebilling are the cheapest.

  18. I don’t see this as a free market issue. What is is about is a company that is protecting its source of revenue from customers that don’t pay and customers that are scamming them.

    In regards to Sprint’s “Spending Limit Fee”, Sprint does a credit check on their customers…those customers that have “bad” credit (i.e. not paying their bills on time; have unpaid balances; debts written off; etc) have a choice: 1) sign up for the AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives its money in a timely matter or 2) pay an additional $ 7.99 a month because Sprint realizes that some accounts won’t pay as well as the costs for collections and etc.

    Please remember that Sprint could decline service to customers with poor credit. Or could be like the water, electric, sewer, etc. that requires a deposit if you have poor credit. They are only asking that a customer pays their bill with AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives their money after providing a service.

    1. If you have poor credit Sprint requires a deposit to establish service, the spending limit is a feature/condition of all plans regardless of credit. Those with good credit have higher limits those with lower have lower limits. The fee exists regardless of what your limit is, it’s simply a means of offsetting the costs of processing payments. Autopay and ebill are the cheapest, POS, check, one time CC processing is more expensive.

  19. Sprint’s “Spending Limit Fee”…Sprint does a credit check on their customers…those customers that have “bad” credit (i.e. not paying their bills on time; have unpaid balances; debts written off; etc) have a choice: 1) sign up for the AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives its money in a timely matter or 2) pay an additional $ 7.99 a month because Sprint realizes that some accounts won’t pay as well as the costs for collections and etc.

    1. My issue is that traditionally, bad credit meant that you paid more for financing, not more for the product itself. Paying $7.99 doesn’t seem in line with traditional business practices.

  20. I don’t think that we got the whole story from the LW and/or enough research was done about the “Sprint’s Spending Limit Fee” to call it a junk fee.

    Sprint does a credit check on their customers…those customers that have “bad” credit (i.e. not paying their bills on time; have unpaid balances; debts written off; etc) have a choice: 1) sign up for the AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives its money in a timely matter or 2) pay an additional $ 7.99 a month because Sprint realizes that some accounts won’t pay as well as the costs for collections, debt write-offs and etc.

    Please remember that Sprint could decline service to customers with poor credit. Or could be like the water, electric, sewer, etc. that requires a deposit if you have poor credit. They are only asking that a customer pays their bill with AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives their money after providing a service.

    Some readers will argue that Sprint should raise their prices but why should customers that pay their bills on time pay for customers who don’t pay their bills on time and some of them who intentionally do NOT pay their bill.

  21. I disagree, it is NOT a nonsense fee.

    What is is about is a company that is protecting its source of revenue from customers that don’t pay on time; don’t pay at all and customers that are scamming them.

    In regards to Sprint’s “Spending Limit Fee”, Sprint does a credit check on their customers…those customers that have “bad” credit (i.e. not paying their bills on time; have unpaid balances; debts written off; etc) have a choice: 1) sign up for the AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives its money in a timely matter or 2) pay an additional $ 7.99 a month because Sprint realizes that some accounts won’t pay as well as the costs for collections, writing off bad debts and etc.

    Please remember that Sprint could decline service to customers with poor credit. Or could be like the water, electric, sewer, etc. that requires a deposit if you have poor credit. They are only asking that a customer pays their bill with AutoPay to insure that Sprint receives their money after providing a service.

    Some readers will argue that Sprint should raise their prices but why should customers that pay their bills on time pay for customers who don’t pay their bills on time; don’t pay their bills at all or even some of them who intentionally do NOT pay their bill.

  22. You can vote because the article is slanted for a ‘Yes’ vote because vital information on what the Sprint’s Spending Limit Fee is all about was not disclosed in the article; therefore, it came across as a junk fee.

    Yes…Sprint screwed up by charging the customer the fee since the LW was already on AutoPay BUT that is NOT the question of the poll. The question of the poll is Sprint’s Spending Limit Fee is a junk fee.

    I will vote ‘No’ because it is related to the credit worthiness of a customer and the customer can avoid it if they set up an AutoPay…ACH draft from savings; ACH draft from checking; debit card or credit card.

    1. I vote yes because all new accounts, regardless of the credit worthiness of the customer are subject to these requirements, i.e. sign up or pay. Thus, the argument that its related to credit worthiness is specious.

    2. It has nothing to do with credit worthiness, the spending limit is higher for those with good credit and lower for those with bad credit. The fee is for processing higher cost payment methods, such as POS, check, one time CC/bank card payments.

  23. It has nothing to do with credit. Its a fee to offset the cost of higher more expensive payment processing. Autopay and ebilling are the cheapest, POS, check, and one time bank/CC payments are more expensive.

  24. Ah, yes. I love Google, too. However, my problem is that, notwithstanding nearly 40 years as a commercial law attorney, I am still not able to tell what the Spending Limit Program Charge” really is, why it’s applied, or what it’s for.

    Sprint’s Terms & Conditions state “…A $7.99 monthly Spending Limit Program charge will be added to new accounts….” By itself, it does not say exactly what it’s for, or why it’s applied, just that it is. I could drive a truck through the gaps in these Ts & Cs. All that’s clear is that the charge can be waived if you sign up for both AutoPay and eBill. How nice. Gee, thanks, Sprint. But it still doesn’t say why it’s applied in the first place.

    That’s my problem.

  25. Absolutely, yes. I read the Sprint’s terms Chris cited a couple of times and still didn’t get. It’s a non-sense in a term of what it means.

    A telecom bill is the one we must be the most careful with compared to other utility bills. I was about to write avoid auto pay and eBill. This is the best way to monitor bogus fees. When you pay a bill as an voluntary action, then you will more likely to notice a rate change. My Comcast paper bill (a PDF version is available online) includes a break-up for the total, which helped me to spot the bogus “convenience fee”. I always look for a notice of service/rate changes as well in the paper bill.

    But then, this “Spending Limit Program Charge” is waived by auto pay and eBill. Hmm…this is a tough double-bind. Maybe the whole intention of this new charge is to slip in additional bogus fees later…

  26. Sprint is insane. When we switched to T-Mobile on August 30, I got a collection bill from their collection department saying I owed them $1273 and that the landline box thing I’d been suckered into getting (we never used it…they said if I got it, they could enroll me in the military or Navy Federal discount program, neither of which ended up saving anything) was shut off for late payment.

    Except I wasn’t late. My bills came out around the 23rd of every month and they were paid automatically out of our account on the 15th of every month. So that $1273 (for the phone balances) wasn’t due until the September bill came out (9/23 to be paid 10/15). So they accelerated the due date for no reason and in fact never even asked me to pay the amount in any sort of itemized bill before just shifting the phone balances to the collections department less than 2 weeks after switching to T-Mobile. They acknowledged they did in fact do this (accelerate a portion of the bill).

    When I called to find out why the collection letter had been sent an entire month before my due date (sent 9/12, due date was 10/15 after a 9/23 bill was generated), they just wanted me to pay the amount due without seeing any sort of bill. They refused to see this practice as a big issue (I think everyone would agree they’d like to see an itemized bill before paying that amount of money). I told them to disconnect the landline box and asked what the termination fee was and was told $170. I asked him 5 times to tell me that was ALL that would be owed. He said $170 every time and all told me the September bill would be the final.

    In October, we got ANOTHER collection letter (remember, it wasn’t due until 10/15) and so I called again because we never got the copy of the bill and I found out they’d also put a $15 late charge on the account… FOR NO REASON. We were NEVER late with payments. The CSR was going to ask a supervisor but we never heard anything about why the late fee was on there.

    Five days later, around 10/23 (the date the REAL final bill was generated) I called Sprint again and was told that the $1410 they’d debited from our account on 10/15 was ALL WE OWED and that the September bill had in fact been the final. She also saw the late fee, but said we really had a zero balance (she thought the late fee had been removed). Not trusting Sprint anymore, I had her take me off autopay once and for all. And she gave me a $50 credit for how long I’d spent on the phone (we’d had tons of other issues in the past which were documented and why we switched to T-Mobile). I figured I’d never see the $50 because we had nothing to credit it to and I was sure they wouldn’t send a check.

    And now they are saying we owe the landline termination fee again. Except it turns out it wasn’t billed until October 23. So, they lied about the final bill. They lied about the zero balance. They lied about the late fee.

    When I FINALLY got a supervisor on the line to figure out their screwy billing and the lack of correct information (I literally confirmed everything with every person I’d talked to at least 5 times… I don’t trust Sprint), they still kept saying I owed $180. I kept asking where my $50 credit had gone and it took an hour for them to determine that I really had been given a credit. So they reduced the bill to $130.

    I told them I wanted the $15 late charge credited, too, because it had been put on after that collection letter fiasco and I’d never been late. I was only late on their accelerated schedule, BEFORE a bill was generated. Once the bill was generated, they took their money from our account on time.

    When I asked for the late fee credit, the supervisor got really nasty and said that there was “NO WAY” I’d get more than $50. I told him that the $50 was $50… it NEVER included the late fee. I would never have agreed to that. I told them to pull the tapes because I was NOT paying that fee. I was told it didn’t exist. That at the time of that call (when I got the credit) I had a ZERO balance. This guy said “she could have just given the $15… I WILL NOT GIVE YOU MORE.”

    I made him get me another supervisor. When she got on the phone, she said “you’ve never been late” and I said “that’s correct”. She credited me an additional $20, which I agreed to.

    My problem with Sprint is that they can’t figure out what you’ll end up owing every month. Our bill went from $170 with three lines to $210 with a fourth line added, to $260 after my parents got new phones, and then up to a whopping $385. The SWORE the “framily” plan base would only cost $200. With the three new phones, it shouldn’t have been more than an additional $70 ($30 for my mom and $20 for my dad and my phones). There was no explanation of why it was $385 and they could never explain it. Every time I ran the numbers, it should have been around $270… $290 AT MOST. That’s why we switched.

    Bottom line is that Sprint has whacked out billing practices, CSR’s who have no idea how to calculate the monthly charges (and again, I verified what the charges should have been with the store employee at least three times), and they don’t follow through with their promises. I should never have had to call in to get that $50 credit applied. Not given, but applied. They never applied it after it was given. It was in the notes, but that’s it. It took them 2 hours to actually apply the credit and then they refused to honor the flat $50 by also removing the bogus late charge. I kept telling the guy that that charge should have been removed well before my final October conversation. He just got nastier and nastier. I’m glad we switched. Our bill for 4 lines is now $200.

  27. It seems clear that we don’t have all the info here.

    It’s also notable that the “Spending Limit Fee” document Chris linked to said the fee is for NEW CUSTOMERS. I’m willing to bet both sides are wrong here.

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