Iberia advised us of our “passengers’ rights,” but then ignored them all

Occasionally our advocates encounter cases, like Beth Agnew’s, that make us want to beat our heads against the wall in frustration. Read more “Iberia advised us of our “passengers’ rights,” but then ignored them all”

What all the recent United Airlines headlines may mean for travelers

Now that the dust has almost settled from United Airlines’ infamous passenger-expulsion incident, travelers are left with several important and largely unanswered questions about how this kerfuffle will change air travel — if it does at all. Read more “What all the recent United Airlines headlines may mean for travelers”

As European airlines master their poker face, we’re calling their bluff

Mary Lynn Oglesbee was scheduled to fly from Venice, Italy, to Dubrovnik, Croatia, on Spanish low-cost carrier Volotea. But the airline had other plans. Read more “As European airlines master their poker face, we’re calling their bluff”

Watch your representatives vote for smaller airline seats

Here’s something you don’t get to see every day: Your elected representatives giving airlines a license to make the seats as small as they want, as long as they can pass a sham “safety evacuation” test.
Read more “Watch your representatives vote for smaller airline seats”

Will this be the year for passenger rights?

The travel industry doesn’t exactly have a sterling reputation for keeping its promises.

That’s true not just of the lofty low-price guarantees that some hotels offer but hedge with lawyerly fine print. It also applies to something as seemingly straightforward as an airline sticking to its published schedule. (Check the contract; it isn’t required to.)

So travelers might be forgiven for having been a little skeptical last year when they were promised help in the form of long-overdue government regulation and laws that would compel airlines to treat them better and tell the truth about their fares.

Maybe it’s a statement about the process, but the most commented-upon proposed rule had practically nothing to do with enhancing consumer protections. It was a new regulation to limit the consumption of peanuts on a plane.

“It was really amazing,” said Cynthia Farina, a professor of law at Cornell University, which helped create the site Regulationroom.org to collect consumer comments. “We had more comments on that than on all the rest – combined.”
Read more “Will this be the year for passenger rights?”