We missed our flight by minutes — should we be forced to pay extra to get home?

Michal Escobar and her husband were returning home from a special vacation in Italy. But when they tried to check in for their flight on British Airways, the check-in agents prevented them from flying. The Escobars had to pay for a hotel room for the night as well as expensive walk-up rates for tickets home on Aer Lingus the next day.

The DOT has fined fewer airlines this year. Should you be worried?

If it seems as if airlines are getting away with more passenger-unfriendly behavior, maybe it’s because they are.

The Aviation Consumer Protection Division of the Department of Transportation (DOT), which is responsible for enforcing federal consumer-protection regulations, is on track to punish significantly fewer airlines this year, issuing 18 consent orders for $3.1 million in civil penalties. By comparison, the DOT had 29 orders worth $6.4 million for 2016, which included a $1.6 million fine against American Airlines for violating its tarmac delay rules handed down in mid-December. Barring a last-minute flurry of penalties, 2017 will be a much quieter year for the department.

Did this traveler really abandon his dog “curbside” at the airport?

Aron Szekely’s complaint stunned our advocates — but not in the way he had hoped. When American Airlines refused to allow his faithful dog on a flight to Japan, did this military man simply abandon the animal at the airport?

Will a new bill hold the travel industry accountable?

Imagine a world where your cruise line or airline pays you if it fails to keep its schedule, you aren’t penalized for a canceled reservation if your hotel is able to resell the room and ticket change fees are related to the actual cost of changing your flight schedule.

Impossible, right?

Could you help us get a refund for our trip to Puerto Rico?

Edward Epstein books a bundled vacation package to Puerto Rico through Expedia but, in the wake of Hurricane Maria’s wrath, he’s forced to cancel his trip to the beleaguered island. While Expedia willingly refunds his hotel expense, American Airlines offers only credit for the airfare portion of the package. Can our advocates convince American to fork over a full refund?

An American Airlines agent switched my ticket to a different airport and forgot to tell me

When Kriengsak Athikomvittaya traveled from Japan to Bangkok, Thailand, he was not expecting his trip to cost an additional $280 for a cab ride between airports in Tokyo. The American Airlines agent who changed his ticket didn’t mention that his new flight was at a different airport than the one he’d originally booked.

Because of the hurricane, my flight was canceled — twice. Why can’t I get a refund?

When Brenda Alvarez’s flights to Costa Rica are canceled because of Hurricane Irma, she tries to secure a refund from American Airlines but it only offers 10 percent of the original cost of her flights. She wants to know if we can help her get more.

Shouldn’t airlines make their websites easier for seniors to use?

When Henry Milnark inadvertently purchases priority boarding for his wife during American Airlines’ online check-in process, his wife is told to request a refund online. But American responds that the fee is nonrefundable. Can our advocates help the Milnarks recover the fee? And should American simplify its website?

Is a two-hour delay worth 25,000 American miles?

When Maurice Woolman’s flight from Berlin to Madrid was delayed, he worried that he wouldn’t be able to make his connection to Miami, which was scheduled to take off 70 minutes after his arrival in Madrid.

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