No oceanview room – and no refund

Photo of author

By Christopher Elliott

Mary Fahy pays extra for a nonrefundable oceanview room through Expedia, but when she checks in, she’s given quarters overlooking the other side of the property. Is she owed a refund?

Question

I recently booked a hotel room for a three-night stay at the DoubleTree Beach Resort by Hilton Hotel Tampa Bay – North Redington Beach through Expedia. I opted to pay the higher rate of $239 a night to guarantee a beachfront room. The lower rate of $199 was refundable but would not guarantee the oceanview room.

My husband and I decided it was worth the risk of losing our $800 so that we can have the oceanview. This was risky since we have four small children and anything could have happened to force us to cancel our reservation.

When we arrived at the hotel on Friday, March 2nd, they gave me a landview room and told me that Expedia booked me a landview room. I thought that once Expedia was called, the issue would be resolved, but after an hour on the phone with a supervisor who was extremely rude, no such luck was experienced.

Expedia’s deceptive booking practices

When I went back to read my confirmation from Expedia, it said nothing about the oceanview room — only that I was guaranteed a king bed. This is false advertising and a scam as when I booked the room, Expedia’s website clearly stated that I was booking a guaranteed oceanview room. The hotel was completely booked all weekend and couldn’t do anything for us.

They told me that this happens every weekend with at least 4 reservations coming in telling them the same thing. Expedia clearly is pocketing the extra money and booking the landview rooms for the customers who paid the higher rate to have an oceanview room. We never would have stayed at this hotel if oceanview rooms were not available or guaranteed.

When I came home from my trip, Expedia was called one last time, and a supervisor, who offered me a $50 voucher to use with Expedia, was spoken with, and that’s the best he said could be done. I told him I was not interested in accepting a $50 voucher for Expedia to have my money taken and false promises made by them.Can you help? — Mary Fahy, Chicago

Answer

If Expedia sold you an oceanview room, then you should have received an oceanview room. Alternatively, you should receive a refund of the difference between an oceanview and a standard room.

Generali Global Assistance has been a leading provider of travel insurance and other assistance services for more than 25 years. We offer a full suite of innovative, vertically integrated travel insurance and emergency services. Generali Global Assistance is part of The Europ Assistance (EA) Group, who pioneered the travel assistance industry in 1963 and continues to be the leader in providing real-time assistance anywhere in the world, delivering on our motto – You Live, We Care.

Is having an oceanview room a big deal? In your case, yes. You specifically asked for it, you paid extra for it, and you gave up your right to a refund. Definitely worth it, by the way. The views of the ocean are spectacular on Florida’s west coast, and well worth paying a little extra to see.

Seeking resolution from Expedia

But if an oceanview room was so important, why not check your confirmation to make sure it’s there? You just spent a lot of extra money for an amenity, but didn’t check your receipt to make sure you received it. If you had, you could have phoned Expedia and fixed this long before you checked in. (Related: This is how to fix an Expedia booking mistake.)

Once you checked into the hotel, Expedia wasn’t the only higher power to which you could appeal. You could have also phoned Hilton corporate to ask it to upgrade your room after the hotel turned you down. (Here’s how to fix your own consumer problems.)

I asked Expedia about your case. Its records show you booked your room through a phone agent. It reviewed its call records and determined that the agent incorrectly guaranteed ocean view accommodations at the time of purchase. The company has refunded the $120 rate difference and offered you a $50 travel coupon. It can be used for a future purchase.

Did Expedia do enough for Mary Fahy?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...
Photo of author

Christopher Elliott

Christopher Elliott is the founder of Elliott Advocacy, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that empowers consumers to solve their problems and helps those who can't. He's the author of numerous books on consumer advocacy and writes three nationally syndicated columns. He also publishes the Elliott Report, a news site for consumers, and Elliott Confidential, a critically acclaimed newsletter about customer service. If you have a consumer problem you can't solve, contact him directly through his advocacy website. You can also follow him on X, Facebook, and LinkedIn, or sign up for his daily newsletter. He is based in Rio de Janeiro.

Related Posts