This is war! Whose side are you on?

Unless you read the federal register for fun, you probably missed the Oct. 2 regulatory review by the Department of Transportation. It invites comments from the public as the agency considers “existing regulations and other agency actions” to evaluate their continued necessity, determine whether they are crafted effectively to solve current problems, and evaluate whether they potentially burden the development or use of domestically produced energy resources.

Sounds pretty innocent, right? Read more “This is war! Whose side are you on?”

Does penalizing airlines for customer service infractions do any good?

The Department of Transportation fined airlines $4.5 million in 2016 for infractions ranging from lengthy tarmac delays to failing to compensate passengers for lost luggage, almost double last year’s amount and the highest since 2013.
Read more “Does penalizing airlines for customer service infractions do any good?”

Do airlines always give out accurate compensation information? DOT fines say no.

Is your airline telling you everything? After a government operation that netted four airlines, the unsurprising answer is: No. Read more “Do airlines always give out accurate compensation information? DOT fines say no.”

New DOT initiatives target airlines’ baggage fees and price transparency. Are they enough?

When the Transportation Department (DOT) announced new “enhanced” protections for air travelers last week, the reaction was predictable. Airlines complained loudly that they were being re-regulated. Consumer groups offered a collective eye-roll, grumbling that it wasn’t enough. And the government cheerfully congratulated itself. Read more “New DOT initiatives target airlines’ baggage fees and price transparency. Are they enough?”

Frequent-flier programs could face tighter regulation — if customers speak up

The federal government is on the verge of regulating airline frequent-flier programs. But how far it goes may depend on you.
Read more “Frequent-flier programs could face tighter regulation — if customers speak up”