As airlines try to monetize seat assignments, are disabled passengers being left behind?

Flying with a disability is never easy, but in the past, airlines have lightened the burden a little by offering passengers such as Scott Nold advance seat assignments. Read more “As airlines try to monetize seat assignments, are disabled passengers being left behind?”

Has the passenger shaming movement gone too far?

You’ve seen the pictures, haven’t you?
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A midair confrontation leaves a passenger speechless

Benjamin Levine is still trying to make sense of a confrontation with a flight attendant on an American Airlines flight from London to Dallas.

Adding to his confusion: a passive-aggressive response from the airline that stopped short of an apology. He turned to our advocates for help sorting it out.
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Seated next to a pooch on a plane? Too bad

Some airline passengers are more equal than others, as Michael Morris found out when his daughter and 2-month-old granddaughter visited him from Los Angeles this summer.
Read more “Seated next to a pooch on a plane? Too bad”

Why you shouldn’t accept your airline’s apology

Potowizard/Shutterstock
Potowizard/Shutterstock
If you’ve experienced a recent flight delay or service disruption, then you probably know that for better or worse, no one says “I’m sorry” like an airline.

A well-crafted apology is often just the beginning. Gift cards, credits and loyalty points — lots of loyalty points — frequently follow. And the mea culpas appear to work. Most passengers accept them and move on.

Well, maybe they shouldn’t.

A closer look at the airline industry’s “sorries” suggests they sometimes lack sincerity and show a remarkable unwillingness to fix the problem that caused the complaint in the first place. In other words, it’s more like hush money than an apology.
Read more “Why you shouldn’t accept your airline’s apology”