Alitalia promised to cover my lost luggage, but the check never arrived

After John Nealon’s bags go missing, his airline sends him shopping. Why won’t it cover the bill? Read more “Alitalia promised to cover my lost luggage, but the check never arrived”

Airberlin lost my luggage and offered a voucher instead of reimbursing me

When Lawrence Kessler’s luggage is diverted to Vienna, he buys $48 worth of new clothes — a modest amount by European standards. Now his airline, Airberlin, refuses to cover those costs. Can it do that? Read more “Airberlin lost my luggage and offered a voucher instead of reimbursing me”

Renault got me lost — can you help me find a refund?

James DiProspero’s rental car is getting him lost. Is the company responsible for hours of missed vacation time? Read more “Renault got me lost — can you help me find a refund?”

Never mind, American Airlines — just send me a refund!

Howard Madnick calls it the “disappearing reservation” trick. And it happened to him several times.

In just a moment, I’ll let him describe a bizarre series of circumstances that led to several reservations being made for his 12-year-old son, Harrison, and then lost. American has offered a resolution, but he wants to know: Is it enough?

I’ll let you decide.
Read more “Never mind, American Airlines — just send me a refund!”

Hey AT&T, I want my voice mail back!

Aylin Gaughan’s attempt to upgrade to a new iPhone fails, but that’s not the worst of it. Her voice mails are now missing. Can AT&T get them back?
Read more “Hey AT&T, I want my voice mail back!”

Hey everyone, let’s help Ginny Foxworth with her lost luggage claim! (American won’t)

If you’ve read this question once, you’ve read it a hundred times. But it never gets old, because it’s probably happened to you, too.

Ginny Foxworth and her husband flew from Orlando to Panama City, Panama, on American Airlines last month. They checked a bag. They never saw it again.
Read more “Hey everyone, let’s help Ginny Foxworth with her lost luggage claim! (American won’t)”

No more lost luggage? It’s not science fiction

Lost luggage may soon become as rare as lost airline tickets — or, at least, you’d think so when you talk to someone like Randal Collins.

Collins, a flight attendant based in Chicago, left his iPad on a recent flight. He had tagged it with a $25 device called Tile that emits a wireless signal up to 100 feet. It also uses a network of other Tile users to help owners find missing objects.

The tablet proved to be elusive, first tracking at his arrival gate. By the time he showed up to claim it, the plane had been moved to a hangar. Collins reported the iPad missing, and a few weeks later, another Tile user picked up its trail, displaying its likely location in a terminal at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport.
Read more “No more lost luggage? It’s not science fiction”

There’s something “odd” about this lost-luggage claim

Ali Jaffery’s lost-luggage claim is denied because of “substantial discrepancies” in the claim. Can Southwest Airlines do that?
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Why doesn’t this Wells Fargo customer want his missing wallet?

Studio/Shutterstock
Studio/Shutterstock
When Peter Verstage finds a wallet on a London bus, he tries to do the right thing and return it to its owner. Easier said than done.

Question: I found a wallet on the bus in London containing some cash, the business card of a personal banker at Wells Fargo in Denton, Texas, and a Wells Fargo Platinum credit card and debit card.

Being a good citizen, I emailed the personal banker suggesting that he contact his customer with my details so that I could return his property to him.

I received no reply, so I telephoned Wells Fargo’s customer service number on the debit card and explained the situation to the agent who answered. She said that the bank would not be prepared to contact their customer on my behalf, and the agent and I agreed that my only alternative was to spend the cash and throw away the wallet.
Read more “Why doesn’t this Wells Fargo customer want his missing wallet?”

What to do if your hotel doesn’t exist

Darren Bradley/Shutterstock
Darren Bradley/Shutterstock
For just $89 a night, the all-suite hotel in Killeen, Tex., promised Steven Hoybook and his family “European-style luxury” – an offer that seemed too good to pass up.

But Hoybook wishes that he had. When he and his family arrived, they found the hotel’s windows and doors shuttered. “They were out of business,” says Hoybook, who lives in Minneapolis. He couldn’t reach Orbitz, the site through which he’d booked the room, so the family found accommodations at a nearby Marriott, paying $111 a night for a smaller room.

When Hoybook finally reached the online travel agency by phone the next day, a representative “seemed sympathetic, leading us to believe that they would reverse the charge for the closed hotel,” he recalls. But after months of back-and-forth, during which the Hoybooks formally disputed the credit card charge for their first hotel, Orbitz referred their bill to a collection agency.
Read more “What to do if your hotel doesn’t exist”