Don’t let them ignore your travel complaint. Here’s how.

It’s complaints season in the travel industry, as Adeodata Czink will tell you. Read more “Don’t let them ignore your travel complaint. Here’s how.”

Putting entitled travelers in their place

They’re spoiled. They’re demanding. And they’re ruining travel for everyone else.

Don’t take my word for it. That’s what employees say about these guests, who they derisively call “silver spoon” travelers.

Wait, did I just say “ruin” travel? Well, yeah.
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Maybe first class passengers aren’t so special after all

One piece of conventional wisdom has gone unchallenged during our ongoing debate about class, privilege and human dignity in air travel: that the elites sitting in the big seats are subsidizing everyone else’s low fares.

Maybe it’s time to challenge that conventional wisdom.
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He paid for a first-class seat, but it didn’t last all the way to Portland

“We feel like we were taken advantage of,” says Mike Sevier, who recently flew from Tucson, Ariz., to Portland on US Airways. “Scammed at worst.”
Read more “He paid for a first-class seat, but it didn’t last all the way to Portland”

She says she paid for a first-class ticket, so why didn’t she get one?

When Gloria Brimley booked a flight from Chicago to El Paso on US Airways through Cheaptickets, she thought she was getting a cheap first class seat.
Read more “She says she paid for a first-class ticket, so why didn’t she get one?”

Worst upgrade ever — how about a refund?

It’s a six-hour flight from Honolulu to Phoenix, so when a US Airways agent offered Blair Fell an upgrade to first class for just $350, he jumped at the opportunity.

“The agent convinced me by saying, ‘Wouldn’t you like to lie back and sleep?” he remembers.
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United Airlines promised me two first class tickets — where are they?

Dude, where are my first-class tickets? / Photo - Tipek US Air
In the customer service world, a first-class, roundtrip ticket anywhere the airline flies is the ultimate mea culpa — an airline’s way of saying, “We’re really sorry.”

And United Airlines promised Charles Rosenthal and his girlfriend two of them after canceling their flight from Palm Springs, Calif., to Los Angeles recently. But the tickets never arrived, and my inquiries to United have had disappointing results. Do I need to push harder, or let this one go?
Read more “United Airlines promised me two first class tickets — where are they?”