The ultimate guide to losing and finding your luggage

It weighs you down, it costs extra, and airlines love to lose it. Luggage is something most travelers wish they didn’t have to worry about — which is exactly why you should think about it before your next trip.

Selecting the right luggage might be the easy part. Knowing your rights when your bags are lost or misplaced isn’t. (And if you travel enough, your luggage will eventually get lost.) Read more “The ultimate guide to losing and finding your luggage”

The best way to buy airline tickets

From phoning a travel agent to clicking an airline site, there are many ways to book air travel. Maybe too many. So what’s the best way to buy airline tickets?

It depends. Here’s a guide to help you sort it out.  (last updated Jan 5, 2021) Read more “The best way to buy airline tickets”

How to get an airline to waive its rules now

Well, that didn’t take long. The U.S. airlines have quietly started tightening their rules again, even as COVID-19 cases take off in America. And now, travelers want to know how they can get an airline to waive its rules. (reprint) Read more “How to get an airline to waive its rules now”

If American Airlines gave you a flight credit, this is what you need to know

Last February, Susan Dunlap was excitedly planning an adventure to Hawaii. Unfortunately, soon after she made the reservation, the coronavirus made it clear the trip was ill-advised. Despite her hopes for a full refund, American Airlines quickly issued a hefty $2,635 future flight credit.

Now, Dunlap is afraid that the pandemic will make it impossible to ever use that flight credit from American Airlines. So she’s asking the Elliott Advocacy team to mediate a cash refund instead.

But can we?  Read more “If American Airlines gave you a flight credit, this is what you need to know”

Is your child old enough to fly alone? You better be absolutely sure!

If you send your child on an international journey, you better make sure they’re old enough to fly alone — on all portions of the itinerary.

Tessa Hadlock was confident that her worldly 13-year-old child could fly alone to Spain and back. Unfortunately, she was only half right. On the way home from Barcelona, the airline denied her son boarding. It turns out the child wasn’t quite old enough to fly alone after all. (Reprint) Read more “Is your child old enough to fly alone? You better be absolutely sure!”

Why did British Airways cancel my flight and leave me stranded?

After a lovely trip to Scotland, Ross Smith and his family were shocked to find that British Airways had canceled their flight home in error. That mistake snowballed into an $8,500 financial headache for the Smith family.

Can we figure out what went wrong? Read more “Why did British Airways cancel my flight and leave me stranded?”

Everything you need to know about EC 261 and European air travel rights

If you’re flying on a European airline, you have more rights than you may think. The reason? EC 261 (also referred to as the EU 261), the European consumer regulation, gives broad protection for passengers — far broader than anything offered by U.S. airlines.

But it’s not a perfect regulation and it doesn’t apply to every flight. What’s more, the rule has been strained by the COVID-19 pandemic, and the effects on EC 261 could last a generation. Bottom line: You need to study EC 261 carefully before invoking it. But it’s worth knowing. Read more “Everything you need to know about EC 261 and European air travel rights”

No, you can’t fly internationally with just a library card!

Elgy Gillespie was on her way to the airport when she lost her passport. No problem, she thought. Having recently read an article that suggested she could fly with just a library card, she was confident that she could talk her way onboard her international flight. But when a Norwegian Air Shuttle agent unequivocally denied her boarding without a passport, she was stunned by his lack of understanding.

Now she wants the Elliott Advocacy team to intervene. Can we?

Read more “No, you can’t fly internationally with just a library card!”

United Airlines put me on another airline! Can I refuse?

In late May, Maria Gatchalian was still hoping to vacation in Greece in July with her family. But United Airlines had already canceled their nonstop and put them on a connecting flight on another airline — without notice. After Gatchalian accidentally discovered the surprising news, things went from bad to worse. When she tried to cancel the trip, United Airlines told her she would need to make any changes through Lufthansa.

With nearly $5,000 at stake, Gatchalian wants to know if United Airlines can really arbitrarily put her family on another airline and then refuse to assist further.  Read more “United Airlines put me on another airline! Can I refuse?”