I canceled my reservation for a full refund — so why did Sleep-Inn charge me $400?

When Robert Williams cancels his reservation at a Sleep Inn through Travelocity, he receives a verification — but no money. What gives? Read more “I canceled my reservation for a full refund — so why did Sleep-Inn charge me $400?”

If AT&T fails and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?

If a company promises a discount, but there’s no record of it, did it really happen? Read more “If AT&T fails and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?”

CenturyLink couldn’t connect, so why do I have to pay a $200 cancellation fee?

When Matthew Scott cancels his CenturyLink account, the company tries to charge him a $200 cancellation fee. After all he’s been through, he thinks that’s too much. Is he right? Read more “CenturyLink couldn’t connect, so why do I have to pay a $200 cancellation fee?”

Airline declines credit card, then hires collection agency to extract $510 “cancellation” fee

Kalevi Ruuska contacted me with an urgent problem recently. One of his friends was being asked to pay an odd cancellation fee by Air Berlin, and would not take “no” for an answer. The airline had hired a collection agency to pursue its claim.

His story underscores a fact few of us here in the United States seem to understand: No matter how bad airline fees are here, they’re worse in Europe.

It also suggests that when it comes to surcharges and ancillary fees, there’s a lot of room for growth. I almost hesitate to write about this case, because it might give some of the more fee-happy airlines here in the States ideas for making more money.
Read more “Airline declines credit card, then hires collection agency to extract $510 “cancellation” fee”