Is this passenger entitled to a hotel reimbursement from American Airlines?

When John Thompson lands in Washington D.C., he discovers that the last connecting flight to Boston has left without him. An American Airlines representative assures him not to worry — he will be put on a flight the next morning and his hotel will be covered for the night. So why is his request for reimbursement rejected?

Why would I need a U.K. driver’s license to rent a car in Florida?

When Keith Montgomery went to pick up his rental car in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., he had his driver’s license handy. But the rental car facility refused to rent him the car for which he’d prepaid, and forced him to pay for a new rental car. That’s because Montgomery is a dual U.S.-U.K. national who lives in London, and he needed his British driver’s license, which he didn’t have available.

Southwest is willing to fix most problems — so don’t threaten legal action

When Southwest Airlines cancels Cameron Rostron’s flight and it can’t be rescheduled for several days, she asks to be rerouted. She assumes this will be a complimentary change. But it isn’t, and then she threatens legal action if she isn’t refunded the change fees and fare differential. Is this threat necessary?

A stranger on my bus tour made me sick. Can I get a refund?

When Gayle Hackner takes a Trafalgar bus tour throughout Spain and Portugal for 13 days, she is disgusted that a man and his young son in adjacent seats appear to be sick. Their constant coughing irritates her. The last straw comes when she becomes ill on the last day of the tour.

The real reason why Silicon Valley is the world’s most elusive tourist attraction

Silicon Valley draws me to it like a powerful magnet, with its Mediterranean climate, irresistible culture of innovation and iconic technology brands that have defined a generation. It pulls in my whole family, which, like many Americans, lives in a world defined by Apple, Facebook and Google.

Are you as confused as these travelers about United’s upgrade system?

When Marco Lippman booked his United Airlines ticket for a flight from San Francisco to Frankfurt, Germany, he received a message that “four tickets were left at this price” that qualified for upgrades. But when he tried to upgrade his ticket, he found himself on a waitlist. And United’s website still contained a notation that upgraded tickets were available.

Expedia never confirmed my ticket and I had to buy a new one for six times the price

When Anne Maertz receives emails from Expedia indicating that her upcoming flight on Norwegian Airlines is “booked and confirmed,” she takes the online travel agency at its word. But when she arrives at the airport, Norwegian claims that she doesn’t have a ticket. Can our advocates help her get a refund for the new airfare she was forced to purchase?

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