Airberlin changed my flight and added a 19-hour layover

Stella Clark is traveling through Europe when she receives an alert of a schedule change to her upcoming Airberlin flight — one that turns a four-hour jaunt into a 29-hour overnight journey. Why won’t the airline allow her to cancel this unpleasant itinerary?

This traveler says that he doesn’t understand trip insurance so he didn’t buy it. Now he needs it.

When Solomon Gizaw purchases his air tickets for a trip to Africa, he doesn’t buy travel insurance. Now he has to cancel his trip for medical reasons, but he doesn’t want to pay a change fee. Can our advocates help him get it waived?

No, American’s Preferred Seating is not considered an upgrade

On a recent trip to Mexico Allen Lipscher purchased tickets on American Airlines and paid extra for seat assignments, but he believes he did not fly in the type of seats he bought. He wants refund, but is this case really one where American messed up, or is it a case where the customer didn’t understand what he was buying?

Are you as confused as these travelers about United’s upgrade system?

When Marco Lippman booked his United Airlines ticket for a flight from San Francisco to Frankfurt, Germany, he received a message that “four tickets were left at this price” that qualified for upgrades. But when he tried to upgrade his ticket, he found himself on a waitlist. And United’s website still contained a notation that upgraded tickets were available.

Expedia never confirmed my ticket and I had to buy a new one for six times the price

When Anne Maertz receives emails from Expedia indicating that her upcoming flight on Norwegian Airlines is “booked and confirmed,” she takes the online travel agency at its word. But when she arrives at the airport, Norwegian claims that she doesn’t have a ticket. Can our advocates help her get a refund for the new airfare she was forced to purchase?

The timing of this toddler’s birthday cost this family an unexpected $4,000

Leslie Hillandahl and her husband received an unpleasant surprise recently, when they tried to check in for their return flight from Italy. If they wanted to bring their newly-turned-two-year-old son back home with them in business class, they would need to pay an additional $4,000.

When you ask for too much, your rightful claim can be overlooked

Taylor Jennings has a tough time getting his bags from Baton Rouge, La., to Cleveland. Then his flight home to Louisiana is canceled. Rather than wait three days for a new Delta Air Lines flight, he takes matters into his own hands by buying his own ticket from American Airlines and returning home the next day. Naturally, he expects Delta to reimburse him for his American ticket. Unfortunately, this was not the best way to handle the situation. Can our advocates help him get reimbursed nevertheless?

JustFly charged me $500 for seat assignments — after I paid for my tickets

When Anne Lederhos needed to purchase air tickets between Boston and Rapid City, S.D., she visited JustFly.com, made a reservation and paid $1,575 for tickets on American Airlines. But when she received her credit card bill, there was also a separate charge for $578, listed as “seat assignments.”

Those four missing letters on your child’s airline ticket will cost you $2,000

Damon Terzaghi plans a trip to New Zealand to introduce his recently born child to his family. When making the reservations, he mistakenly uses his stepson’s nickname on one of the four tickets. Of course, it doesn’t match the name on his stepson’s passport.

Is a French air traffic control strike a valid reason to deny EU 261 compensation?

Tim Murphy booked flights on Expedia for himself, his wife and their four children for an Italian vacation. A strike by French air traffic controllers threw a wrench in their plans. Now he wants to know if his missed connections are fixable.

Venezuela is not safe for tourists. Can I get a refund on our tickets?

Jorge Taborda and his wife decide to take a trip with their children to Venezuela to visit extended family. But now that they’ve taken a closer look at the current economic and political situation there, they would like to cancel their tickets and receive a refund. Can they?

My Aeroméxico ticket was wrong, and I don’t want to pay the change fee

Gail Creath didn’t confirm her Aeroméxico ticket was booked for the correct date, and the flight left without her. Although the airline was willing to reinstate her ticket for a fee, she didn’t like that option — we don’t recommend what she did next.

Yes, this traveler should pay the $28 to correct this spelling error

When Donald Kushner booked his ticket on Czech Airlines, he made a “small” spelling error with his name. Then he found out the “absurd fee” that the airline is expecting him to pay to correct it. Now he wants to know if he should just take his chances and try to use the ticket as is.

The fee: just $28.

Here’s why you should triple-check your reservations before you hit “confirm”

There’s an old saying that the devil is in the details. It’s especially relevant when you’re dealing with air travel. That’s because if you don’t pay careful attention to the details when making your reservations, there can be the devil to pay.

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