If you don’t buy a $7,000 television, LG won’t give you a free tablet

David Guggenhime thinks that LG Electronics owes him a free tablet (not to mention an American Express gift card) for purchasing one of its TVs. He contacted us because he alleges that the company didn’t make good on its offer. Or was it Guggenhime that didn’t live up to his end of the bargain?

Did this man make a $10,000 mistake, or is he a victim of an online scam?

When Kenneth Copeland uses the web browser on his phone to purchase concert tickets, he is pleased when he receives an email confirming his desired seats. However, the shock comes when he scrolls down to the price he just paid — over $10,000 for four tickets.

Read this before you file a chargeback on a delayed flight

When Milton Dortch and his wife planned their trip from Atlanta to New York in December 2015, Dortch booked their flights on Delta Air Lines, using his American Express SkyMiles credit card. On their day of travel a series of violent thunderstorms caused delays in the southeastern U.S., and Dortch arrived at his destination 10 hours late.

What’s the difference between a cancellation penalty and an administrative fee?

Mistakes happen — it’s a fact of life and of business. But when a mistake by two companies results in a customer losing $500, who should reimburse the client? That’s what Henry Vogt wants to know. His case raises some important questions about disclosure and ethics that could affect your next travel purchase.

Oh, for Chrysler’s sake — honor the advertised price!

When Larry Chrysler saw a good deal posted on American Express Travel, he was ready to book it. His flight of interest was on Air France, going from New York’s JFK airport to Tel Aviv, Israel. The advertised flight listed all the pertinent details, times, layovers, flight numbers, even the declaration: “3 tickets left at this price” and the price, of course.

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