I thought I was paying for checked luggage, not priority boarding

When Mary Lou Hartline buys an American Airlines ticket, she inadvertently pays extra for priority boarding instead of checked bags. Can she undo the mistake? Read more “I thought I was paying for checked luggage, not priority boarding”

Hello, relaxation? Not with this Booking.com reservation

Vivian Mello’s vacation rental in Maui is uninhabitable. So why won’t Booking.com refund her money? Read more “Hello, relaxation? Not with this Booking.com reservation”

Accidentally booked 10 nonrefundable nights instead of one on Expedia

Roland Tognazzini pushes the wrong key when he reserves a room through Expedia and ends up with nine extra unwanted rooms. They’re nonrefundable. Is there any way to fix the error? Read more “Accidentally booked 10 nonrefundable nights instead of one on Expedia”

What is there to “consider”? The passenger is dead

Vicki Berkus wants to know how nonrefundable “nonrefundable” airline and cruise tickets really are.

Actually, so do I.
Read more “What is there to “consider”? The passenger is dead”

I’ll never fly again — can I get a refund from my airline?

Brenda Brown will never fly again. So why won’t United Airlines refund her nonrefundable ticket?
Read more “I’ll never fly again — can I get a refund from my airline?”

Case dismissed: Oops, I booked eight nights instead of one

Meryl Lee Seewald thought she was booking just one night at the Holiday Inn Miami International Airport. Instead, she booked eight.

Now she’s stuck with a nonrefundable one-week reservation at the hotel. Oh, if she’d only used a professional travel agent!

But wait: Seewald is the travel agent, and the reservation is for a client who is taking a cruise.

Now what?
Read more “Case dismissed: Oops, I booked eight nights instead of one”

Mercy! Airlines should refund tickets for cancellation, death, disease and other unfortunate circumstances

When should airlines refund a nonrefundable ticket?

More often than they do. A lot more often.

About 9 in 10 respondents to a recent survey say they should get their money back when a flight is canceled for any reason. More than 88 percent of the respondents to the multiple-choice poll also said airlines should issue a refund with a death certificate, presumably to the next of kin.

Nearly 80 percent said airlines should let passengers off the hook and refund their money when they have a communicable disease.

Only one-third of the respondents said refunds should be given when a passenger can’t make it to the airport for reasons beyond his or her control, and less than 5 percent said money should never be returned on a nonrefundable ticket.
Read more “Mercy! Airlines should refund tickets for cancellation, death, disease and other unfortunate circumstances”