These miles got lost in the merger … or did they?

Since the American Airlines-US Airways merger, many travelers have been holding their breath waiting to feel the effects of the complexities of merging two legacy carriers.
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Should I send these Rube Goldberg ticket cases to the recycler?

My head is spinning after reading Amy Zimmerman’s complaint about Aeroplan, Turkish Air and Swiss.
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Fly a mile, earn a mile? No, that would make too much sense

James A. Harris / Shutterstock.com
James A. Harris / Shutterstock.com
Looking back, Jill Constable’s mistake wasn’t flying to Australia on American Airlines and Qantas. The connections from Dallas to Sydney, Ayers Rock, and Cairns made sense, from a scheduling point of view.

It was the reason she chose the so-called “codeshare” flights.

“I wanted the miles,” she confesses.

Constable assumed that she’d receive credit for all of her flights to and from Down Under, plus the domestic flights booked through American. (Codesharing, for the uninitiated, is the fundamentally dishonest act of selling another airline’s flight as if it was your own, but I’m not going down that rabbit hole today.)
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Name change stops Marriott point conversion — can it be reversed?

All Leslie McCormick wanted was to convert her Marriott points to American Airlines miles. But what should have been a simple transaction was complicated by a little red tape and a severed corporate relationship, and now McCormick’s points are going nowhere.

If nothing else, her story underscores the fickle — some might say, unreliable — nature of loyalty programs. But in the end, it also shows that some companies truly value your business.
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Reactivate this: After airline cancels miles, frequent flier promises “I’ll never fly American again”

aaparkedWhen American Airlines stripped 43,000 miles from Peter DeForest’s frequent flier account because of “inactivity” it offered to return them if he signed up for one of its email offers.

It seemed like a reasonable deal. But the miles never came, and when DeForest checked the American Web site to see how he could reclaim his lost award points, he was shocked to find the airline driving a much harder bargain with some of its customers.
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