Are airlines going to get away with a lie?

If the airline industry gets its way, and its cleverly named Transparent Airfares Act of 2014 passes, then the price of your airline ticket could drop significantly. At least, it’ll look that way.
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3 sweet lies you should thank a company for

Ollyy/Shutterstock
Ollyy/Shutterstock
As far as rejection letters go, the one I almost never use is unfailingly polite.

It’s apologetic. It blames a “system” in which the deck is stacked against you, the consumer, for my failure to accept a case. And it offers several other options, including small-claims court or a credit-card dispute, as possible alternatives.

But a few weeks ago on this site, I confessed that I hate using the rejection letter when someone turns to me for help as a consumer advocate.
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“Unbundling” is a brazen lie and it’s time for the travel industry to come clean

McAuley/Shutterstock
McAuley/Shutterstock
It’s been five short years since the airline industry, led by an ailing American Airlines, quietly stripped the ability to check your first bag at no extra cost from the price of an airline ticket — an act given the antiseptic name “unbundling.”

At about this time in 2008, passengers were beginning to adjust to a new reality, as other airlines eagerly joined in separating their luggage fees from base fares. Now, they’ve finally accepted the fee revolution, according to most experts.

An airline ticket doesn’t have to include a “free” bag or a meal, no more than a hotel room should come with the ability to use the hotel’s exercise facilities, or your rental should cover the cost of a license plate. And that’s the way it should be, they say.

Well, the experts are full of it.
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Ridiculous or not? Lie-flat airline seats = snoring epidemic

While everyone else is touting the benefits of new “lie-flat” airline seats in business- and first class, I know I can count on you, dear readers, to find a “down” side.

And here it is.
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Liar, liar! 28 percent of hotel guests admit they stretched the truth for a discount

If you’ve ever fudged a few facts to get a hotel discount, you’re not alone. Almost 3 in 10 hotel guests admit they stretched the truth to save a few bucks, according to a new survey.

Asked if they’d ever lied to secure a discount, 28 percent said “yes.” A majority — 72 percent — said they’d never misstated a few facts in order to save money.

The survey of more than 800 travelers was conducted last week by readers of this site, Consumer Traveler and members of the Consumer Travel Alliance.

Although the number of hotel guests who say they’ve lied may seem high, it mirrors similar surveys conducted in the past. (I’ve dealt with the subject of guest honesty in previous columns, including this memorable story.)

Of course, not everyone can agree on a definition of lying.
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