My mom used Chase QuickPay and accidentally sent $1,450 to a stranger

Yunnie Son’s mother sends $1,450 via Chase QuickPay to what she thought was her daughter’s account. It wasn’t. Read more “My mom used Chase QuickPay and accidentally sent $1,450 to a stranger”

“People’s money disappears into black holes”

When Kamuran Alpural returned his broken refrigerator to Sears, the company promised him a refund of $1,000. Sears provided him with a transaction confirmation indicating that the refund had been issued to his account at Commerce Bank. But when Alpural checked his account the next day, the refund was not there. It didn’t show up in his account for five days. Read more ““People’s money disappears into black holes””

Can’t get Beaches resort deposit refunded or transferred

Cheryl Ames was planning to visit Beaches Turks & Caicos, an island resort operated by Sandals southeast of the Bahamas. She paid a deposit of $500 and scheduled her trip for next year. But now she can’t go — and Beaches won’t return her deposit.
Read more “Can’t get Beaches resort deposit refunded or transferred”

Are e-checks a safe way to pay for travel?

Stevanovich/Shutterstock
As she paged through Viking River Cruises’ glossy brochure one recent afternoon, Diane Moskal noticed a new way to save money: If she booked the Waterways of the Tsars itinerary sailing from Moscow to St. Petersburg with something called an e-check, the cruise line promised to knock $100 off the fare.

An e-check is an electronic debit to your checking account, and it’s billed as a quick, convenient way to pay for your vacation that is “as easy as providing your credit card number,” according to Viking.

But like any smart traveler, Moskal wasn’t content with that explanation. “I see that the cruise lines advocate consumer savings if you pay by e-check,” she says. But she also found several complaints online, which made her hesitate. She wondered: Are e-checks safe?
Read more “Are e-checks a safe way to pay for travel?”

Should airline tickets be transferrable?

Tratong/Shutterstock
As Ralph Santopietro sees it, Delta Air Lines had him over a barrel when he tried to change the dates on a flight from Myrtle Beach, S.C., to Hartford, Conn.

A ticket agent in Myrtle Beach offered to rebook Santopietro, a retired high school teacher, on the new itinerary. But his $238 ticket credit would be all but consumed by a $200 change fee, and then he’d have to pay a $538 fare difference.

How about transferring the ticket to his cousin, who would take the flight as originally planned? Nope, said the agent, citing security restrictions on ticket name changes.

“I didn’t like those choices,” he says.
Read more “Should airline tickets be transferrable?”