The lies your financial advisor tells you (and how to spot them)

When it comes to getting advice — especially financial advice — truth can be such a relative thing. Read more “The lies your financial advisor tells you (and how to spot them)”

The truth about airline lies (can you handle it?)

The busiest summer for air travel is almost over.

But for many passengers, this flying season was the lyin’ season. Week after week, readers crammed my inbox with accusations that a flight attendant or customer service agent misrepresented the truth when they traveled.
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The rise of the insincere travel offer – and what to do about it

Before Brenda Galindo retired to Winterville, N.C., Continental Airlines made her a promise: The frequent flier miles she’d earned from her business travel wouldn’t expire.
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If they lie to us, why can’t we lie back?

Travel companies lie to you all the time. Why can’t you lie right back?
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Are airlines going to get away with a lie?

If the airline industry gets its way, and its cleverly named Transparent Airfares Act of 2014 passes, then the price of your airline ticket could drop significantly. At least, it’ll look that way.
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3 sweet lies you should thank a company for

Ollyy/Shutterstock
Ollyy/Shutterstock
As far as rejection letters go, the one I almost never use is unfailingly polite.

It’s apologetic. It blames a “system” in which the deck is stacked against you, the consumer, for my failure to accept a case. And it offers several other options, including small-claims court or a credit-card dispute, as possible alternatives.

But a few weeks ago on this site, I confessed that I hate using the rejection letter when someone turns to me for help as a consumer advocate.
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“Unbundling” is a brazen lie and it’s time for the travel industry to come clean

McAuley/Shutterstock
McAuley/Shutterstock
It’s been five short years since the airline industry, led by an ailing American Airlines, quietly stripped the ability to check your first bag at no extra cost from the price of an airline ticket — an act given the antiseptic name “unbundling.”

At about this time in 2008, passengers were beginning to adjust to a new reality, as other airlines eagerly joined in separating their luggage fees from base fares. Now, they’ve finally accepted the fee revolution, according to most experts.

An airline ticket doesn’t have to include a “free” bag or a meal, no more than a hotel room should come with the ability to use the hotel’s exercise facilities, or your rental should cover the cost of a license plate. And that’s the way it should be, they say.

Well, the experts are full of it.
Read more ““Unbundling” is a brazen lie and it’s time for the travel industry to come clean”