Donald Trump is making American consumers great again. Here’s how

Donald Trump is good for consumers. Read more “Donald Trump is making American consumers great again. Here’s how”

More than $1k for an annual Disney pass? Quaaaaaack!

The Internet is having a Donald Duck-like tantrum after hearing news that Disney’s popular theme park annual passes jumped by up to 35 percent, crossing the psychologically important $1,000-a-year-mark.
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Who’s to blame for this tourist trap?

Monhegan Island, Me., is almost too pretty for words. That’s probably how the problem started; everyone wanted to go there.

It isn’t easy or inexpensive. A one-hour ferry ride from Port Clyde, on Maine’s rugged middle coast, will set you back $32 roundtrip.
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When it comes to airfares, you get what you pay for

Here’s a fascinating graphic from our friend Bob Herbst, who shares a few numbers about airline ticket prices that might make you wish for the good ol’ pre-deregulation days, when airlines competed on service, not price.

During the last two decades, Amtrak’s average passenger revenue per mile is up 125 percent, and commuter rail revenues have jumped a respectable 45 percent.

Meanwhile, airlines are down nearly 10 percent.

Airfares haven’t even kept up with inflation.
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No airline cookie conspiracy? What about this trail of crumbs?

Airlines and online travel agencies surreptitiously use computer “cookies” they’ve implanted on your Web browser to track your activity on their sites and then raise prices when it appears that you’re interested in a fare. That’s the rumor, at least.

I inadvertently resurrected a long-simmering controversy over this rumor a few weeks ago, when I blamed airfare fluctuations on a practice called “caching,” which lets airlines or travel agencies store a copy of all fare information on their sites. Caching is efficient and cost-effective for the company, but less than 5 percent of the fares may no longer be available.

So what’s really going on?
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