The only game that really matters

Who’s going to win the big game?

No, not that game.

I’m talking about the game businesses play with us. Mark up, mark down. Bait and switch. And, of course, the loyalty game.

If you’re not thinking about that game, you are going to lose — and that could cost you. Read more “The only game that really matters”

When it comes to these Super Bowl tickets, the odds are really against you

All Efren Bojorquez wanted to do was take his dad to the Super Bowl.

Easier said than done. Securing tickets to the big game has become next to impossible, with only a tiny percentage of tickets being sold directly to fans. With such an incredible demand and so few seats available for purchase by the public, the price for tickets has skyrocketed, with a street value at times north of $10,000 per ticket.
Read more “When it comes to these Super Bowl tickets, the odds are really against you”

Is buying a ticket at face value and selling it at a profit right?

I’m honored to introduce our newest columnist, Kent Lawrence. Kent’s weekly feature, ‘Is This Right?’, will focus on the ethical dilemmas customers face. As the executive pastor of a Dallas church and a graduate of the University of Missouri at Columbia’s prestigious journalism program, Lawrence is uniquely qualified to ask that question. I can’t wait for your answers.

Picture this: it’s the Friday night before the Super Bowl, and you’re in the market for game tickets.

What are you willing to pay for the $800 to $1,900 face value tickets? $1,000? $2,500? $4,000?

Shockingly, on the Friday night before the Super Bowl, the cheapest available tickets were listed at almost $10,000 each.

Let that sink in for a minute.
Read more “Is buying a ticket at face value and selling it at a profit right?”

The TSA wants to be everywhere in 2013 — here’s why we shouldn’t let it

Photo by Nathan Hansen/Hansenlawoffice.com
Photo by Nathan Hansen/Hansenlawoffice.com
When the Minnesota Vikings faced off against the Green Bay Packers last weekend in Minneapolis, the big story wasn’t that the Vikings defeated the Pack to secure a wildcard berth.

It was, strangely, the TSA.

That’s right, the agency assigned to protect America’s transportation systems was patrolling the Metrodome. Nathan Hansen, a North St. Paul, Minn., attorney, snapped a few photos of the agents before the game, and broadcast them on Twitter.

“I don’t think any federal law enforcement agency needs anything to do with a football game,” he told me yesterday.
Read more “The TSA wants to be everywhere in 2013 — here’s why we shouldn’t let it”