Will the long airport lines of spring break 2016 be back again this year?

If you’re already bracing for a long airport security line during the spring break travel season, then you must remember last year.

You do, don’t you? That’s when Transportation Security Administration screening wait times doubled under the weight of tighter security and swelling crowds. On just one day in mid-March, 6,800 American Airlines customers reportedly missed their flights, thanks to the lengthy TSA lines. Read more “Will the long airport lines of spring break 2016 be back again this year?”

FAA funding bill may mean big changes for fliers – or none

An impending fight in Congress this spring over the Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization bill could affect your next flight, for better or worse.

Trade associations call the appropriations bill the most important piece of legislation in the travel industry. The last one, passed in 2012, not only funded the FAA but also turned tarmac-delay rules into law and established an advisory committee for Aviation Consumer Protection.
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Should tarmac-delay rules become law?

As someone who has spent a career listening to travelers complain, I know what you don’t like when you’re on vacation.

You hate being ripped off by airlines, car rental companies and hotels. Silly rules frustrate you, too. So does bad customer service.

But what you don’t tell me is often just as important.
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Weekend survey: What’s the most important air travel issue for lawmakers?

The controversial, often-delayed FAA Reauthorization bill is being debated in Washington next week. The proposed legislation covers a lot of ground, from funding NextGen air traffic technology to forcing airlines to disclose fees.

This week’s big question: Which of these issues are the most important to you, the traveler?
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Will this be the year for passenger rights?

The travel industry doesn’t exactly have a sterling reputation for keeping its promises.

That’s true not just of the lofty low-price guarantees that some hotels offer but hedge with lawyerly fine print. It also applies to something as seemingly straightforward as an airline sticking to its published schedule. (Check the contract; it isn’t required to.)

So travelers might be forgiven for having been a little skeptical last year when they were promised help in the form of long-overdue government regulation and laws that would compel airlines to treat them better and tell the truth about their fares.

Maybe it’s a statement about the process, but the most commented-upon proposed rule had practically nothing to do with enhancing consumer protections. It was a new regulation to limit the consumption of peanuts on a plane.

“It was really amazing,” said Cynthia Farina, a professor of law at Cornell University, which helped create the site Regulationroom.org to collect consumer comments. “We had more comments on that than on all the rest – combined.”
Read more “Will this be the year for passenger rights?”