An unexpected health crisis leads to a lost honeymoon. Can we help?

Larry Bonistalli is a determined father. When his son’s fiancée suffers a sudden stroke right before their wedding and honeymoon, Bonistalli resolves to retrieve the money that the couple spent on the uninsured trip. Can we help him with this quest? Should we help?

Does travel insurance cover a pre-existing condition and the death of a loved one?

Robert Hamilton was looking forward to his six-night stay in Colorado that he booked through VRBO and Turnkey Colorado. But he also knew that with his mother-in-law hospitalized, he probably should buy travel insurance just in case the unthinkable happened. It also led us to wonder if travel insurance always covers a pre-existing condition and the death of a loved one.

British Airways won’t give me proof that my ticket was nonrefundable

After a terrorist attack in London, Kelly Bukaty cancels her British Airways flight. But her travel insurance company won’t reimburse her airfare without proof that her ticket was nonrefundable. Can our advocates help Bukaty get British Airways to provide documentation to resolve her insurance claim?

Offended by our request for more information? We can’t help

“These researchers for Chris Elliott respond with more legalese than the cotton-pickin’ insurance company did.”

This was the response we received from Donald Norton to a question we asked him about his case.

Our advocates often need to follow up with additional questions to determine whether we can help consumers requesting our assistance. We do this when we receive help requests with information that appears to be unclear or incomplete. Most of these consumers are happy to provide us with the answers to our questions, but some take offense. When that happens, we can’t help them.

I canceled my cruise, why can’t I get a refund for my trip insurance?

Zelma Friedling booked a Caribbean cruise a year in advance but canceled after two hurricanes hit the islands they were scheduled to visit. The cruise line refunded the money she paid for the cruise, but neither the cruise line nor the travel insurance company will refund what she paid for travel insurance.

Will we help her get her money back?

Didn’t buy trip insurance? You might still have it

Sheri Schmidt’s husband suffers a massive stroke before their non-refundable flight to Brazil. Because she didn’t purchase trip insurance, JustFly informs her that a refund is not possible and that there will be hefty change fees associated with these tickets. But hold on — could Schmidt have the protection of an insurance policy after all?

I couldn’t get to my vacation rental during the hurricane. I want a refund

When Gary Molinaro and his friends booked a vacation home on the coast of South Carolina, they weren’t anticipating any problems. But then Hurricane Irma started churning toward the mainland and the group decided to cancel. This must be a valid reason for a refund. Right?

This traveler says that he doesn’t understand trip insurance so he didn’t buy it. Now he needs it.

When Solomon Gizaw purchases his air tickets for a trip to Africa, he doesn’t buy travel insurance. Now he has to cancel his trip for medical reasons, but he doesn’t want to pay a change fee. Can our advocates help him get it waived?

Your credit card’s “free” trip insurance may not offer the protection you need

When Monique Tubb’s adult daughter was injured while vacationing in Colorado, she canceled the rest of her trip and flew home immediately. Tubb was confident that her UnitedPlus Explorer card’s complimentary trip insurance would cover all the additional expenses. It didn’t. And now she wants to know why her full claim was not paid.

Here’s why it’s important to read the terms of your trip insurance policy

When John Joseph and his wife planned a trip to Universal Studios, they thought it might be a good idea to purchase travel insurance. After all, they were paying a great deal of money for their trip, and they wanted to make sure they could get it back if they weren’t able to go. They purchased a “cancel-for-any-reason” policy through AAA Travel for their Universal Vacation Package.

No, finding “airline goo” on your bags does not lead to a successful $16,000 claim

What happens when a traveler discovers that three pieces of her luggage have been ruined by an unidentified type of “airline goo” and asks Interjet or her travel insurance company to compensate her to the tune of $16,000? Lynda Leibrock can tell you: Nothing.

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