Why travel companies should spy on you

SMA/Shutterstock
SMA/Shutterstock
It’s probably a matter of weeks, if not days, before yet another round of troubling National Security Agency leak stories hit the news.

I’m sorry to disagree with a majority of Americans who are outraged by their government’s reckless data dragnet, but I think surveillance is good, at least, if you travel.

Airlines, car rental companies and hotels ought to spy on their customers more often. Collecting information about you to improve customer service — and only for that purpose — could return the American travel business to greatness.

Yes, even airlines.
Read more “Why travel companies should spy on you”

Don’t tape my junk: Travelers catch surveillance fever

Don’t touch my junk became a protest anthem against intrusive airport security screenings, thanks to John Tyner’s now-famous pre-Thanksgiving encounter with TSA agents in San Diego.

But the incident is part of a little-noticed trend among travelers: The confrontation was videotaped not just by airport security cameras, but also by the would-be passenger.

Tyner, an Oceanside, Calif., software developer, recorded his interaction with TSA screeners on his cell phone and posted the clips to his website, and the incident went viral within a few short hours.

Travelers may be one of the most monitored groups of Americans. Whether it’s cameras in airports, hotels or train stations, software that tracks your activity when you book online, or applications that record your customer-service calls for “quality assurance purposes,” you can be assured that someone is watching when you’re away.

And now, travelers are watching back.
Read more “Don’t tape my junk: Travelers catch surveillance fever”