My American Airlines flight was delayed multiple times, but the airline won’t compensate me

A long string of delays kept Flora Rodriguez-Brown in Dallas an extra night when she was supposed to be airborne on an American Airlines flight to Costa Rica for her vacation. Read more “My American Airlines flight was delayed multiple times, but the airline won’t compensate me”

Shouldn’t Hawaiian Airlines reimburse me for all of my expenses?

After Hawaiian Airlines canceled their flight, Victoria Wasserman and her family spent over $500 for food and hotel accommodations. Wasserman sought full reimbursement from Hawaiian Airlines, but it would pay only half of the cost. Read more “Shouldn’t Hawaiian Airlines reimburse me for all of my expenses?”

I bought a plane ticket. So why am I on this dingy bus?

Normally, even with a connection, the trip from Charlotte, N.C., to Manchester, N.H., should take roughly five hours. But for Catherine Jackson and her husband it was twelve. Read more “I bought a plane ticket. So why am I on this dingy bus?”

Should we tell people like Howard Uman to get lost?

Yesterday’s update from the trenches of consumer advocacy sparked an interesting debate. Do we leave consumers who don’t have a case to fend for themselves?

I ask because some of you apparently believe we should. If consumers are unaware of a company policy or aren’t following the rules, we should tell them to get lost. Nicely, but firmly.

Beat it. We only help deserving consumers.
Read more “Should we tell people like Howard Uman to get lost?”

Is this enough compensation? A $150 voucher for denied boarding in Bremen

Ted Oehlerking’s flight from Bremen, German, to Seattle, via Amsterdam was canceled all the way down the line. Although his airline, KLM, put him on the next available flight and upgraded him, it didn’t offer him any financial compensation for the delays.

Thing is, under EU 261, the European airline consumer protection law, his airline owed him €250 for the denied boarding actions and delays — and perhaps more. Here’s the full text of the rule.

It’s worth taking a closer look at how a regulation like this can affect air travel, since the Transportation Department is on the verge of creating a similar set of rules for the domestic airline industry. And it’s worth asking if there’s ever a point when enough compensation is enough.

A subsequent email to Delta Air Lines, KLM’s codeshare partner, generated a form-letter apology, agreeing that Oehlerking and his wife were, indeed, subject to EU compensation rules. It offered him either a €250 in cash or a €350 voucher for the canceled flights. Is that, plus the courtesy upgrade, enough?
Read more “Is this enough compensation? A $150 voucher for denied boarding in Bremen”