Can this La Quinta hotel really keep my $2,000?

Zachary Smith uses Expedia to book a reservation at a La Quinta Inn and then decides to cancel and stay somewhere else. Unfortunately, he never notices that he has no proof of this cancellation — until the $2,000 bill arrives. Can we help?

This $440 Amtrak voucher is worthless! Can you help me?

Mitchell Bator cashes in an Amtrak voucher for his recent journey from Florida to Connecticut. As he settles into his seat, he is pleased that the entire trip is costing him just $14 in cash. Unfortunately, his credit card statement tells a different story.

A United Airlines error sent us on a one-way trip

When dentist Scott Goldsleger learns a nor’easter is forecast for Newark, N.J., he rebooks a previously scheduled round-trip flight to Costa Rica on United Airlines. But instead of using his travel agency, he calls United directly and books a flight out two days before the storm arrives. The last thing he’s thinking about is the return flight from Costa Rica, because that is supposedly unchanged from the original booking.

Eurostar canceled my train and left us stranded in London

When Eurostar cancels Suzanne Kraft’s train from London to Paris, a company representative says her only option is to buy a new ticket. Turns out that’s wrong, and now the bills are piling up. Is she entitled to a refund — or any kind of compensation?

A stay in a strange, filthy Airbnb is just not her thing

When Andrea Walker is directed to use the service elevator in the building where she is renting an apartment for the weekend, she’s slightly suspicious. However, when she opens the door to the unit she knows she definitely won’t be staying. The owner apologizes for the state of the filthy Airbnb rental and quickly agrees to a refund.

So why does the host later tell Airbnb that she spent the whole weekend there?

American Airlines told me the fare was $169. Then it charged me $1069

Dale Allen and his girlfriend are looking forward to a tropical vacation in Cancún. Unfortunately, they arrive at the airport too late and miss their flight. Wanting to leave immediately, they buy one-way tickets at the American Airlines counter. Allen is sure the agent said that the tickets cost $169 each — so why is his credit card charged $2,400?

Didn’t buy a trip insurance policy? Chase might have you covered

Sheri Schmidt’s husband suffers a massive stroke before their non-refundable flight to Brazil. Because she didn’t purchase trip insurance, JustFly informs her that a refund is not possible and that there will be hefty change fees associated with these tickets. But hold on — could Schmidt have the protection of an insurance policy after all?

The Sheraton Suites abandoned me during the hurricane

n the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, John Monaghan makes his way to the Sheraton Suites where he has a confirmed reservation. He is looking forward to resting his weary head after a day of precarious travel. Instead, he is greeted with a closed hotel and is forced to sleep in his car. Is he due any compensation for his troubles?

TripAdvisor left me on the hook for a $900 cancellation fee

Adelaide Northrop’s preferred accommodation in St John, U.S. Virgin Islands, is unavailable so she books an alternative hotel through Tripadvisor that is advertised as having a zero penalty cancellation policy. When her first choice suddenly offers her a reservation, she happily confirms. The problem? Tripadvisor charges her a $911 cancellation fee.

An Expedia error, a canceled vacation and a $1,300 loss? Not so fast!

Sheila Couch is looking forward to a tropical island getaway with her beau when a work-related emergency puts a sudden end to their plans. Believing that the Expedia insurance she had purchased will protect her prepaid fees for this trip, she files a claim for a refund. But will an Expedia error lead to a $1,300 loss?

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