Wine Country Gift Baskets? No, not the best gift for a teenager

Avis Brown decides to brighten her 19-year-old granddaughter’s day by sending her a basket of holiday snacks from Wine Country Gift Baskets. This thoughtful gesture backfires in a big way when the company delivers a gift of wine to the young lady’s college dormitory instead. Read more “Wine Country Gift Baskets? No, not the best gift for a teenager”

“I have never in my life experienced such disregard for human decency”

Danielle Williams and her fiance were delayed, and then delayed again, when they tried to fly from Dallas to Jacksonville, Fla., during the holidays.

American Airlines apologized, and then apologized again. But did it apologize enough?
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No, CenturyLink, my name is not “John Sweet Candy”

John Sweet’s CenturyLink bill lists him as “John Sweet Candy.” A company representative has apologized for the wrong name and offered a refund and discount. But where’s the money?
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Sizing up the sincerity of corporate apologies

Jason Landman’s stateroom on the Carnival Miracle vibrated from the moment his ship cast off in Long Beach, Calif., until it docked seven days later. “It shook and rattled literally from start to finish of the cruise,” he says.
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3 keys to a successful consumer apology

Docstocmedia/Shutterstock
Docstocmedia/Shutterstock
It’s almost impossible to turn on the TV news or click on your favorite news site without seeing another company apologizing to its customers. There’s Target, saying it’s sorry for the latest data breach. There’s OfficeMax, regretting a flier it sent.

But what about the other way? Do you ever see customers apologizing to a company?

Well, we should, and when it happens, it ought to make the news. In my line of work, I see a lot of consumers behaving badly or publicly accusing a business of something it didn’t do.

I’m no corporate apologist, but it seems to me that in the interest of fairness, those companies — if not their employees — deserve the same courtesy that we ask of them.
Read more “3 keys to a successful consumer apology”