“It is a blatant ambush of personal credit card information”

The pop-up ad Kathy Agosta says she saw after finishing a reservation on Travelocity recently looked like a confirmation screen from the online travel agency, and it offered $20 cash back if she signed up for a service. Although she never shared her credit card information with the advertiser, she found a troubling connection.

“As it turns out, merely clicking on the hyperlink to get more information about the offer apparently allows the advertiser to charge a fee on the same credit card just used to purchase the airline tickets from Travelocity’s website,” she told me. “There is no credit card approval step on this pop-up to warn the Travelocity customer that a charge will be placed by this advertiser on the credit card they just used.”

Is this a more sophisticated version of the opt-out scheme, which Travelocity and other online agencies practice? Or perhaps another shady post-transaction marketing scheme, which may be about to become illegal?

Maybe. Maybe not.
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Never mind! Expedia quietly voids — then unvoids — terms on refer-a-friend promo

expediaPromises were meant to be broken. And if you’re Expedia, unbroken.

At issue is a promotion that offered a £20 hotel coupon code for each referral. When the terms were changed and the codes were suddenly disabled at the end of July, it set off an email campaign to Expedia and to members of the travel media who specialize in solving travel disputes.
Read more “Never mind! Expedia quietly voids — then unvoids — terms on refer-a-friend promo”

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