Errors of omission: 3 tips on how to avoid a disclosure scam

Isak55/Shutterstock
Isak55/Shutterstock
They say the devil is in the details. Moyosore Otepola would probably agree.

She recently booked a hotel reservation in Chicago through an airline website. “I found a better deal and decided to cancel the reservation,” she says. But when Otepola phoned the hotel to cancel, a representative delivered some bad news: the reservation couldn’t be changed. Check the terms of her reservation, the employee scolded.

Her airline had failed to mention that little detail.
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Ship of fine print: 7 clauses to beware of in your cruise contract

If you ever want to feel confused, outraged and powerless all at the same time, just read your cruise line’s ticket contract.

Carrie Streahle didn’t know what was in hers until her cruise arrived late in Houston, and she had to pay an extra $1,900 in airfares and accommodations to get home. She contacted Carnival, asking for reimbursement.

“Carnival’s first response was that we didn’t have travel insurance,” she says. She protested. The cruise line responded again, this time blaming Mother Nature. “They said they can’t control the weather,” she says.
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How to turn customers into critics? It’s in the fine print

As a lawyer, Sam Wyrick is no stranger to fine print. So when Spirit Airlines canceled his flight during its recent strike, he did what any respectable attorney would do: He read Spirit’s contract of carriage, the legal agreement between the airline and its passengers.

Unfortunately, so had the airline employee he dealt with. And Spirit apparently interpreted its own contract very differently.

“Two Spirit representatives — one on the ground at LaGuardia and one at a call center, had said if Spirit canceled our flight, we would be called and rebooked, on another airline if necessary,” he remembers.

But after it notified him that his flight to Myrtle Beach, S.C., was grounded, the airline changed its tune. It offered him a flight credit and a $100 voucher. (Never mind that Section 9.2 of Spirit’s contract suggests it owes him a refund.)
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