We chartered a flight to make our cruise on time. Why won’t Viking make us whole?

Patrick Ryan and seven other passengers are stranded when British Airways’ computer system melts down. They’re traveling to Norway for a cruise and charter a flight so they would arrive in time to board the ship. Now, they can’t get reimbursed and want to know if our advocates can help them. Read more “We chartered a flight to make our cruise on time. Why won’t Viking make us whole?”

Charter will pay my early termination fee, but how do I prove I have one?

When Judd Hollander switches cable companies, Charter agrees to pay his early termination fee. Only problem? AT&T, his former subscription TV company, won’t tell him how much he paid in writing. Can this advocate help? Read more “Charter will pay my early termination fee, but how do I prove I have one?”

A lengthy flight delay does not equal a free vacation

We’ve all heard the expression “All’s well that ends well.” But is the opposite true?

Apparently it is for Megan Kroc. Her Apple vacation ended badly. And she wants her money back for the entire vacation. Read more “A lengthy flight delay does not equal a free vacation”

Government fines airline for … cabotage violations?

True story: The Transportation Department today fined President Air Charter, a Canadian air taxi operator, $20,000. Why? It had apparently violated cabotage laws.

Here’s the consent order (PDF).

If you said cabo…what you’re not alone. Cabotage is an antiquated rule governing the transport of passengers between two points in the same country by an aircraft registered in another country.

Too bad the rule exists, because if foreign carriers were allowed to operate in the U.S., it would improve service dramatically. Can you imagine flying transcontinental on Singapore Air? I argued for cabotage laws to be eliminated in the past — here’s a 2002 op-ed on the subject — but the subject is a non-starter in Congress, unfortunately.
Read more “Government fines airline for … cabotage violations?”