Congratulations, you’ve won a free $1,000 gift card – just click here to redeem it!

If you clicked on this story for your “free” gift card, you’ll definitely want to keep reading. I’ve issued plenty of warnings about “free” products and some of you, dear readers, think I’ve gone too far.

After all, aren’t some of the best things in life free?

Perhaps. (#6: Counting down the top articles of 2019) Read more “Congratulations, you’ve won a free $1,000 gift card – just click here to redeem it!”

Charged four times for one vacation. Why won’t American Express fix this?

When Connie Cullen books a vacation with her American Express card, the resort charges her. Then it charges her again, and again. And again. Why won’t it fix the error? Read more “Charged four times for one vacation. Why won’t American Express fix this?”

Solving the credit card “hold” mystery

It’s like an episode of “Unsolved Mysteries” that plays itself endlessly for travelers.
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Can Capital One really “erase” my debts? And while you’re at it, could you do another rant about loyalty programs?

When Capital One offers to “erase” part of her debts with award points, Kate Morrical calls on a loyalty program skeptic to clear things up. Find out what happens next.

Question: You’ve gone on record plenty of times with your feelings about loyalty programs, so I wondered if you’d seen this ad for Capital One’s “Purchase Eraser.” In it, Alec Baldwin implies that he can “erase” a $700 purchase with 30,000 miles.

But the program overview clearly states that any purchase over $600 is 100 miles per dollar to redeem.
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Is your phone card phony? 5 ways you can tell

phoneWhen is an hour just 36 minutes? When you buy some phone cards, apparently. That’s the conclusion of a recent Federal Trade Commission investigation, which found certain pre-paid calling cards offered an average of just 40 percent of call minutes customers thought they were buying — and some, significantly less.

You should care about this if you travel outside your wireless company’s regular calling area, because that’s when you’re likely to buy one of these cards. If you don’t read the fine print on the agreement, you could end up getting shorted by close to a half hour of talk time, according to the FTC.
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