These trips were saved! A look back at the cases we’ve solved together

Remember the first “Can this trip be saved”?

It was last August, and I asked you to vote on the merits of a case involving an 18-year-old airline passenger who had been stranded in Iceland. Many of you said you wanted to help me decide which problems to mediate — and which ones to turn down — and it seemed worth a try.

Well, it worked. And how!

“Can this trip be saved?” is the most popular feature on this site, no question about it. If I’d known how much you liked to lend a hand with the ombudsmaning, I would have tried this much sooner.

Oh yeah, and that poor kid who was stuck in Iceland? You voted “yes,” and I fixed it for him.

Here’s a look back at some of the memorable cases you helped me solve.
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Can this trip be saved? Help, my airline wants more miles

Glenn Valentine wants to use his frequent flier points to get from Orlando to Sao Paolo, but Delta Air Lines wants too many miles for the trip.

“The system wanted an additional 50,000 to 100,000 Skymiles [for one leg],” he says.

That’s not uncommon. Other airlines, notably the old Continental, had a double or nothing program for frequent fliers trying to redeem their miles.

Is it right for an airline to keep asking for miles? Should I step in and ask Delta to drop its demand?

Before I continue, a few notations about “Can this trip be saved.” Just because I’m asking the question doesn’t mean I don’t already know the answer (although that doesn’t necessarily apply to this week’s case).

Also, the fact that I’m asking if a trip can be saved doesn’t mean I’m in any way endorsing a case. It only means that I’m asking for your opinion.

Back to Valentine.
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Can this trip be saved? He didn’t inspect the car – now they want $700

Bogus car rental damages seem to be a recurring theme on this site. This week’s edition of “can this trip be saved” takes one of those cases in its crosshairs.

Meet Andrew Schultheis, who rented a car from Alamo in Washington earlier this year. When he picked up his vehicle, no one offered to walk around the car with him, which is pretty normal. (I rented a car twice this week, and not only did they not offer to inspect the car, they refused to when I asked them to go over the vehicle.)

Then again, Schultheis didn’t go over the car, either. And that’s where the problem begins.
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