What’s so wrong about travel “hacking”?

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The one rule your airline hates the most

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Case dismissed: “I feel that the insurance is useless”

Marcel Meth’s wife and daughter had plans to visit his recently widowed sister-in-law in Minnesota. As a precaution, they bought a travel insurance policy through Access America.

But they bought the wrong policy.

“Four days before my wife and daughter were to leave for Minnesota, my sister-in-law called us and told us that her son was hospitalized and that he would be remaining in the hospital for a week or more,” he says. “In response to this, my wife needed to cancel the vacation. We obtained all the necessary documentation and filed it with the Access America. They immediately denied the claim, saying that the reason for hospitalization was not covered by the policy.”
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Weekend survey: Do maintenance problems make you reluctant to fly?

Do Southwest Airlines’ recent maintenance problems, which led to widespread aircraft inspections, make you think twice about flying?

If you’ve been paying attention to some of the media coverage (and how can you not?) you might be forgiven for thinking the sky is falling. Or, at least, that planes are falling out of the sky.

Truth is, no one has died — yet.
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Can this trip be saved? My airline tickets were canceled against my will

As far as most airlines are concerned, if you cancel your tickets, your options are pretty simple: You have a year to use them. Or you can let the credit expire, and they keep your money.

But life isn’t always that simple.

Lauren Tse and her two daughters were looking forward to flying to South Florida to see her mother last Christmas. But when they checked in for their flight, they discovered their tickets — which were gifts from Lauren’s mother — had been canceled.

Their airline, US Airways, offered a ticket credit — minus the $150 change fee and fare difference. But they had to pay another $4,000 to fly to Florida for the holidays.
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