My rental car was towed after an accident — now it’s missing!

What should you do if your rental car gets towed and then goes missing while in your possession?

Traveling through the mountains of Colorado at dusk during a snowstorm, Annoris Perez suddenly lost control of her rental car. She was shaken but unharmed. The vehicle? Not so lucky. The rental car was towed from the accident scene, and she assumed she was no longer responsible for it.

She was wrong.

Weeks later, when the rental company called asking for its missing vehicle, Perez found out just how wrong. Now, she needs our team’s help to determine what happened to her rental car after the driver towed it away.

How do I get a refund for this canceled boat tour?

Gerald Stanton canceled a planned boat tour of the Panama Canal after suffering a terrible accident last fall.

That day trip through the canal was scheduled for January of this year — before the coronavirus crisis began. So why is the operator of this excursion blaming the eight-month refund delay on the pandemic?

That’s the $252 question that faces the Elliott Advocacy team today. (Reprint)

If you take $158,000 in jewelry on a flight and it goes missing, who pays?

Traveling with $158,000 worth of anything is a risky endeavor. Rose Cohen found out just how risky when all her high-value jewelry went missing during her recent JetBlue flight.

She believes an organized crime ring targeted her, ultimately forcing her to gate-check the bag that contained the jewelry. Her theory? This move allowed the thieves to help themselves to her gems before the flight even took off.

Now she wants to know who is going to pay for her loss.

Unfortunately, she’s not going to like the answer.

My luggage went missing on the way to the cruise. I’m owed a full refund, right?

If your luggage goes missing on the way to your cruise, should you get a full refund? Pamela Shane thinks so. She says her pre-cruise hotel failed to deliver her suitcase to the dock in time for the ship’s departure. Now she wants $7,000 in compensation for the mistake that left her without her own clothes for the entire cruise.

But wait! There’s a twist. The hotel says it doesn’t even offer such a luggage delivery service.

Can the Elliott Advocacy team figure out what’s going on here? (Reprint)

A drunk driver hit my car rental but I got a $22,158 bill!

Just days into Joe Vandetta’s recent Florida family vacation, a drunk driver crashed head-on into his rental car. Luckily, the hit-and-run accident didn’t cause serious injuries, and the Vandettas — bruised but otherwise unharmed — completed their trip as planned.

But the shock of getting smashed by an intoxicated motorist was nothing compared to the jolt Vandetta received a month later. That’s when Budget Rental Car sent a $22,158 bill — the cost of the vehicle damaged by the drunk driver. 

This hotel just hit me with $500 in fake charges! Help!

Could a hotel charge you for fake damage long after you’ve checked out? By the looks of the Elliott Advocacy files, it seems so.

Imagine this. You’re suffering from a terminal illness and hope to experience some adventures while you’re able to enjoy them. But then, the COVID pandemic comes along and throws a wrench into your plans. After nearly a year of waiting, things seem to be subsiding, so you take off for a short vacation with your family. Unfortunately, an opportunistic hotel manager has been waiting, too — for unsuspecting guests to hit with hefty fake charges.

What would you do if it happened to you? Give up, or fight back?

How did a simple passport mistake end in a $17,766 travel disaster?

Ted Kelley says his wife made a simple passport mistake last year that snowballed into a $17,766 travel disaster.

The couple had never heard of the Schengen area or its passport requirements for U.S. citizens. But when they tried to check in for their business class flight to Italy, a Lufthansa representative quickly explained the facts. Kelley’s wife’s passport didn’t have the required 90-days validity from their return date, and the airline denied boarding to the couple. 

Why did Orbitz cancel my flight, leaving me with a $3,400 bill?

What if a booking agent made a mistake and canceled your return flight home from vacation, leaving you stranded abroad?

During a pandemic. Thousands of miles from home.

That’s what Aruna Krishnamurthy says happened to her last January. She was attempting to come home from India when she discovered Orbitz had inexplicably canceled her flight. That error cost her $3,400 — and hours of stress and anxiety.

Now she wants Orbitz to pay for the high-priced walk-up flight it forced her to buy to get home. But hold on — Orbitz says Krishnamurthy actually canceled the flight, and it doesn’t intend to pay for her mistake.

Can we figure out what’s going on here?

This passport mistake will ruin your vacation every time

Prior to the current global pandemic, Trevor Seamon made a devastating passport mistake and it ruined his family’s dream vacation. In all the preparation for the journey to Italy, he neglected to check the validity of their passports. That error led the Seamons to arrive at the airport with passports expiring within 90 days — invalid for travel. Denied boarding, they missed their eagerly anticipated trip and ended up right back home at the end of the day.

Seamon believes Air France is responsible for this passport mistake, and he wants our team to negotiate a refund. But is the airline responsible for the family’s ruined vacation? (Last updated July 20)

A fake job scam could quickly drain your bank account. This is how

Could you fall for a fake job scam?

If you’re like Sam Erin, you probably answered “no!” She’s a college-educated young adult who was sure she knew how to spot a con game. That is until a phony employment crime ring preyed on her naivety and stole nearly $9,000 from her.

Now, after draining her bank account, the scammers have vanished, leaving Erin jobless and cashless. She’s hoping the Elliott Advocacy team can help. But how?

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