We missed our flight by minutes — should we be forced to pay extra to get home?

Michal Escobar and her husband were returning home from a special vacation in Italy. But when they tried to check in for their flight on British Airways, the check-in agents prevented them from flying. The Escobars had to pay for a hotel room for the night as well as expensive walk-up rates for tickets home on Aer Lingus the next day.

It wasn’t my fault. Why should I be penalized for missing my flight?

It just wasn’t David Ababio’s day.

His back was injured and he couldn’t walk quickly. Then the airport bus wasn’t running. He arrived at the KLM counter ten minutes too late to check in for his flight. And then he learned that KLM considered him a “no-show” for his flight and canceled his itinerary.

Why you should never, ever book your flights this way

Booking an international flight on multiple airlines with separate itineraries can be risky. The potential for problems can far outweigh the savings. Elizabeth Marini found this out the hard way. Her parents purchased her a ticket on TAP Portugal flying out of John F. Kennedy International Airport. She then booked her connecting flight from Boston to JFK on a separate itinerary on Delta Air Lines. That became the precursor of her distressing trip.

I was on the flight, so why did United call me a no-show?

Bernadine Fong enjoyed the outbound portion of her round-trip flight from San Francisco to Newark without incident. But her return trip is a different story. At check-in, United Airlines informs a stunned Fong that she had been a no-show for that original flight. As a result, her ticket home has been canceled. Can we help straighten out this flight fiasco and get her a refund for the one-way ticket she was forced to purchase?

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