Expedia never confirmed my ticket and I had to buy a new one for six times the price

When Anne Maertz receives emails from Expedia indicating that her upcoming flight on Norwegian Airlines is “booked and confirmed,” she takes the online travel agency at its word. But when she arrives at the airport, Norwegian claims that she doesn’t have a ticket. Can our advocates help her get a refund for the new airfare she was forced to purchase?

There were larvae in my room. Shouldn’t Hotels.com refund me?

When Stephanie Slovon discovers that her hotel room is infested with insects, she immediately checks out, but is stung by Hotels.com’s refusal to issue her a refund. Can some buzz from our advocates in Hotels.com’s ear produce some compensation for Slovon?

Is a French air traffic control strike a valid reason to deny EU 261 compensation?

Tim Murphy booked flights on Expedia for himself, his wife and their four children for an Italian vacation. A strike by French air traffic controllers threw a wrench in their plans. Now he wants to know if his missed connections are fixable.

Here’s why you should triple-check your reservations before you hit “confirm”

There’s an old saying that the devil is in the details. It’s especially relevant when you’re dealing with air travel. That’s because if you don’t pay careful attention to the details when making your reservations, there can be the devil to pay.

I don’t like the hotel that was revealed on my Hot Rate deal! Can I get a refund?

Nikki McKinnis played Hotel Roulette — and lost. Hotel roulette? You know that game of chance. It’s booking lodging through Priceline’s “Name Your Own Price” or Hotwire’s “Hot Rates,” where, if your requested price is met, you get a hotel room but without a choice of lodging provider. So you’re either going to be excited about getting a great deal at a nice hotel, or, in this case, disappointed.

Help! My connection time was too short and I wasn’t allowed to fly!

When Kenneth Black’s flight on China Southern Airlines, booked through Travelocity, has a too-short connection time, he finds himself unable to travel. Yet neither the airline nor Travelocity is willing to help him get his money back. Can our advocates straighten out this fiasco?

I wanted $2,400, but United gave me $38! Is this fair?

Arthur Goldberg says he’ll never fly on United Airlines again after his recent trip to Israel. After a trip full of delays and a cancellation, he was offered only $38 and two $100 flight certificates. Goldberg thinks that’s extremely inadequate. But as far as United is concerned, Goldberg’s attitude precludes him from any further consideration.

Mamma Mia! No tour of Italy and no refund

When Doreen Hogle and her husband are forced to cancel their trip to Italy, Expedia offers them credit for their Alitalia air tickets, which expires on a specified date. But that date is coming up, and the Hogles haven’t been able to use the credits to rebook the trip through Expedia. Can our advocates get the Hogles an extension of the deadline or a refund for their canceled trip?

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