You’ve never heard of these people, but they’ve changed the way you fly

Their advocacy results in big, embarrassing airline fines. They’ve helped create federal agencies that make air travel safer. And they’ve brought competition and transparency to the skies.

I wanted $2,400, but United gave me $38! Is this fair?

Arthur Goldberg says he’ll never fly on United Airlines again after his recent trip to Israel. After a trip full of delays and a cancellation, he was offered only $38 and two $100 flight certificates. Goldberg thinks that’s extremely inadequate. But as far as United is concerned, Goldberg’s attitude precludes him from any further consideration.

Why everyone benefits from company transparency

When our research team saw the email from Costco, we wondered whether we were inhabiting an alternate reality — and why it isn’t the norm. Not only did Costco notify us of a personnel change that required a contact update, but it supplied us with the correct information for the new contact, including the person’s full name, email address and telephone number.

The truth about publishing executive contacts? No one else is this crazy

Companies don’t want their executive contacts listed. They’d prefer you call them (no paper trail), and they want to tell you “no” without actually having to put it in writing. When someone comes along and shows consumers a better way, corporate America often goes to great lengths to block the road.

JetBlue Airways

JetBlue’s customer service reputation trends toward the extremes. It’s either really good, with friendly flight attendants, superior onboard amenities, generous legroom and many other customer-friendly practices. Or it’s really bad (think passengers stranded on the tarmac during an ice storm or grandmothers being threatened with arrest for videotaping other passengers). More often than not, though, JetBlue does right. Hopefully you won’t have to use these names.

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