Can Interval International punish me for hurricane switch?

Talk about a bad trade.

Terri Williams swapped her Interval International timeshare credits for a resort in St. Thomas during hurricane season without purchasing trip insurance. Unfortunately, Hurricane Irma inflicted substantial damage to St. Thomas and the resort she traded for will be closed a while, forcing her to cancel her vacation.

I told AT&T to cancel my service, so why is its collection department calling me?

When Bright Eastman’s contractors disconnected her AT&T U-verse cables that provided her with telephone and cable service, Eastman was under the impression that AT&T wouldn’t charge her for the period during which she was not receiving its services. But she was wrong — to the tune of $989.

If I cancel my service after 11 days, why should I be required to pay for an entire month?

Merry Bruton canceled her cable TV service in April after only 11 days of service. But Suddenlink, her cable TV provider, is forcing her to pay for an entire month of service. Why, asks Bruton, does she have to pay for 19 days of service that she isn’t receiving?

Why would I need a U.K. driver’s license to rent a car in Florida?

When Keith Montgomery went to pick up his rental car in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., he had his driver’s license handy. But the rental car facility refused to rent him the car for which he’d prepaid, and forced him to pay for a new rental car. That’s because Montgomery is a dual U.S.-U.K. national who lives in London, and he needed his British driver’s license, which he didn’t have available.

I agreed to pay $26 for car rental insurance, but was charged $26 per day. Can you help me get a refund?

When Frank Diss rents a car in San Antonio, he accepts an agent’s offer of optional insurance coverage for a one-time cost of $26 for the entire term of his rental. But when Diss returns the car, he’s billed $208 more than he expected. Does he deserve a refund?

What’s the difference between a cancellation penalty and an administrative fee?

Mistakes happen — it’s a fact of life and of business. But when a mistake by two companies results in a customer losing $500, who should reimburse the client? That’s what Henry Vogt wants to know. His case raises some important questions about disclosure and ethics that could affect your next travel purchase.

My flight was delayed, so I did a chargeback. Was I wrong?

If you have to ask if you were wrong, you already know that the answer is yes. This certainly was the case for Tiara Sampson — or it should have been.
Sampson’s story should be a warning to all travelers: Expect, and be prepared for, the worst — including delays on all legs of a trip. But if your travel company has delivered you from one location to the one specified on your ticket, then it has fulfilled its contract with you and is entitled to full payment.

He accepted the upgrade and signed a contract. Now he wants his money back.

When Dave Dzurick rented a Chevy Spark from Hertz through Priceline, a Hertz agent persuaded him to spring for an upgrade. Priceline charges in advance for your wheels, but changing from the Spark to an Elantra would cost extra.
Just one problem: The agent who upgraded Dzurick in Milwaukee didn’t tell him.

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