Is the liability limit for a lost bag on NCL really just $100?

“We’re so sorry. This has never happened before.”

This was the response from a Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) customer service agent to Lyle Larson’s complaint after the cruise line lost his family’s luggage while transferring it to their cruise ship. Larson heard it repeatedly during the cruise, along with promises that his missing luggage would arrive later that day or the next day.

It never did.

How can my Spirit Airlines vouchers be worth just two cents?

After Melanie Boock agrees to give up her seat on an oversold Spirit Airlines flight, she accepts two vouchers for future flights – only to find that they have almost no value. Our advocates wonder whether Spirit Airlines’ “bare fare” includes vouchers for two cents.

Why won’t American pay for my Delta flight?

When Brianna Ryan received notice that her American Airlines flight was delayed, she worried that she wouldn’t have time to make a connecting flight. According to Ryan, an American customer service agent promised that if she booked a new flight on another airline, American Airlines would pay for it. But when she sought reimbursement for her new airfare, American denied her request.

Government to airlines: Put it in the contract!

Talk is cheap. That’s the gist of the part of the latest government rulemaking that is likely to give airlines the biggest headache. Instead of just “strongly encouraging” the airlines to adopt customer service plans, the government wants them to put it in their contracts of carriage, the legal agreement between them and their customers.

“I feel that I have been treated pretty lousy by Delta”

Vivian Polzin didn’t have a choice. A Delta Air Lines employee forced her to check a bag that contained a camera with priceless vacation snapshots. But when the carrier lost her camera, it had a choice — and it decided to hide behind its contract of carriage, which says it isn’t liable for electronic equipment in checked luggage.

What am I owed for a 12-hour flight to nowhere?

The passengers on a recent Continental Airlines flight 89 from Newark to Beijing were given an unwelcome lesson in patience. Halfway through the flight, their plane was diverted on a medical emergency and eventually returned to the states, where it was canceled. Then, the next day, the same passengers were finally sent to China. Are these air travelers owed anything for the trouble?

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