Will this traveler ever see her Alitalia compensation?

Chantal Legge is supposed to fly to Toronto on an Alitalia flight from Rome, but the flight is canceled, and Alitalia rebooks her for the next day. But the new flight is overbooked. Legge ends up flying through Boston to get to Toronto. Alitalila promises compensation, but doesn’t deliver. Can we help Legge get what she is due?

When Southwest Airlines follows its contract of carriage but a traveler does not, we won’t get involved

When passengers arrive late for or miss an outbound flight, they’re considered “no-shows.” That’s an industry standard policy. All remaining flights, including their return, are automatically canceled. Their ticket is worthless.

Why won’t American Airlines pay me for my new flight?

American Airlines canceled Gabriel Baisan’s return flight because of a shortage of crew members. With no American flights available until the following day, Baisan was forced to book a flight on Southwest Airlines. He could not miss another day of work. Baisan is asking American to reimburse him for a portion of his ticket. American’s answer? No.

My flight home from Hawaii was canceled. Why?

Charlie Williams and his wife were hit with some flight delays on their way to Hawaii. But then they did something that compounded their problems — something that cost them several thousand dollars. Now they want to know if we can help get their money back.

Why I hate airline code-sharing and — why you will, too

How much do I hate airline code-sharing? Let me count the ways.

I could offer a lot of persuasive answers, starting with the many code-share catastrophe cases we receive every day on this site. I could also point out that code-sharing is a euphemism for passing off someone else’s flight as your own, or in the language of reality, lying.

But I also have personal reasons for detesting code-sharing. They came from my own recent disaster involving Emirates and JetBlue.

I wanted $2,400, but United gave me $38! Is this fair?

Arthur Goldberg says he’ll never fly on United Airlines again after his recent trip to Israel. After a trip full of delays and a cancellation, he was offered only $38 and two $100 flight certificates. Goldberg thinks that’s extremely inadequate. But as far as United is concerned, Goldberg’s attitude precludes him from any further consideration.

Get smart. Sign up for the newsletter.