If you don’t buy a $7,000 television, LG won’t give you a free tablet

David Guggenhime thinks that LG Electronics owes him a free tablet (not to mention an American Express gift card) for purchasing one of its TVs. He contacted us because he alleges that the company didn’t make good on its offer. Or was it Guggenhime that didn’t live up to his end of the bargain?

The Retail Equation and how it protects merchants against serial returners

When Mahitha Sadhanala heads to CVS to make some returns, he isn’t expecting any problems — after all, he has done this many times before. So it comes as a shock when the cashier firmly refuses to accept the items. When he asks for an explanation, she refers him to something called The Retail Equation.

I forgot about my hotel’s 30-day cancellation policy. Can you help?

Jan Peterson booked a weekend at the Bide-A-Wee Inn & Cottages in Pacific Grove, Calif. earlier this year. Then her father-in-law’s condition deteriorated, forcing her to cancel her trip. And then, more bad news: The hotel imposed a 30-day cancellation period because of a special event in town.

Why won’t Chase give me the 50,000 miles I was promised?

Gary Brauch checked his Chase credit card statement. He had charged $2,000 of purchases to his new account and was therefore supposed to receive 50,000 United Airlines frequent flyer miles at this point, according to the promotion that induced him to open his account with Chase. But the miles weren’t there.

We chartered a flight to make our cruise on time. Why won’t Viking make us whole?

Patrick Ryan and seven other passengers are stranded when British Airways’ computer system melts down. They’re traveling to Norway for a cruise and charter a flight so they would arrive in time to board the ship. Now, they can’t get reimbursed and want to know if our advocates can help them.

It wasn’t my fault. Why should I be penalized for missing my flight?

It just wasn’t David Ababio’s day.

His back was injured and he couldn’t walk quickly. Then the airport bus wasn’t running. He arrived at the KLM counter ten minutes too late to check in for his flight. And then he learned that KLM considered him a “no-show” for his flight and canceled his itinerary.

JustFly let me book an illegal route — now I want a refund

Using an online travel agency (OTA) to book a vacation in Asia seemed like a good idea at the time to Mitchell Knutson. But when things went wrong, this traveler claimed that the OTA sold him an illegal ticket. He wants our help to get it to reimburse his $1,000 loss.

How did a ticketing mistake cost this traveler $675?

When Krishna Addanki used the travel website ExploreTrip to reserve a flight to India, he relied on the site to correctly book him and his infant child on United Airlines. But when he arrived at the airport, a United representative told him that his child wasn’t booked on the flight – and he couldn’t fly that day.

National overbooked and left me stranded in Mexico with no car

When Robert Segal and his wife planned their Mexican vacation, they reserved an SUV from National Car Rental through Hotwire. But when they arrived at the National rental facility in Mexico City to pick up the car, they found that there was no SUV available for them to drive off the lot. National had “oversold” its vehicle inventory.

If I cancel my service after 11 days, why should I be required to pay for an entire month?

Merry Bruton canceled her cable TV service in April after only 11 days of service. But Suddenlink, her cable TV provider, is forcing her to pay for an entire month of service. Why, asks Bruton, does she have to pay for 19 days of service that she isn’t receiving?

This traveler says that her flight was canceled. But was it?

Linda Keberle and her husband planned a 12-day Baltic vacation on a Holland America cruise, departing from Copenhagen, Denmark. But while they were still at the Cleveland airport, British Airways shut down its operations. The Keberles canceled their trip, believing that they would not be able to make their connecting flight on British Airways to Copenhagen.

Why would I need a U.K. driver’s license to rent a car in Florida?

When Keith Montgomery went to pick up his rental car in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., he had his driver’s license handy. But the rental car facility refused to rent him the car for which he’d prepaid, and forced him to pay for a new rental car. That’s because Montgomery is a dual U.S.-U.K. national who lives in London, and he needed his British driver’s license, which he didn’t have available.

Was this a Spirit computer glitch or user error?

Alison Boan believes that a glitch in the Spirit Airlines reservation system caused her return flight to be booked on the wrong date and increased her ticket price. Just hours later, when she discovers the problem she calls the airline to switch to the correct flight. So why isn’t she allowed to do so?

No, American’s Preferred Seating is not considered an upgrade

On a recent trip to Mexico Allen Lipscher purchased tickets on American Airlines and paid extra for seat assignments, but he believes he did not fly in the type of seats he bought. He wants refund, but is this case really one where American messed up, or is it a case where the customer didn’t understand what he was buying?

A stranger on my bus tour made me sick. Can I get a refund?

When Gayle Hackner takes a Trafalgar bus tour throughout Spain and Portugal for 13 days, she is disgusted that a man and his young son in adjacent seats appear to be sick. Their constant coughing irritates her. The last straw comes when she becomes ill on the last day of the tour.

Can you help my neighbor with this invalid United ticket?

When Silvania da Silva booked air tickets on United and Azul Linhas Aéreas Brasileiras through the online travel site OneTravel (a brand of Fareportal), she expected to be able to board her flights. But Azul denied her boarding, saying the fare hadn’t been paid — even though she had paid for her tickets when she made the booking.

We booked a cruise and then learned how long it would take to get to the port

When Carole Schachter and her husband booked a cruise vacation in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, they were looking forward to winding along the Columbia and Snake Rivers. But they didn’t factor travel time to the ports of embarkation and disembarkation into their plans — or a penalty for canceling their trip.

The timing of this toddler’s birthday cost this family an unexpected $4,000

Leslie Hillandahl and her husband received an unpleasant surprise recently, when they tried to check in for their return flight from Italy. If they wanted to bring their newly-turned-two-year-old son back home with them in business class, they would need to pay an additional $4,000.

When Southwest Airlines follows its contract of carriage but a traveler does not, we won’t get involved

When passengers arrive late for or miss an outbound flight, they’re considered “no-shows.” That’s an industry standard policy. All remaining flights, including their return, are automatically canceled. Their ticket is worthless.

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