Why would I need a U.K. driver’s license to rent a car in Florida?


When Keith Montgomery went to pick up his rental car in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., he had his driver’s license handy. But the rental car facility refused to rent him the car for which he’d prepaid, and forced him to pay for a new rental car. That’s because Montgomery is a dual U.S.-U.K. national who lives in London, and he needed his British driver’s license, which he didn’t have available.

Montgomery’s unsuccessful car rental is a reminder to carefully read all the terms and conditions of any travel contract or big-ticket purchase, especially if you are trying to take advantage of a special deal offered on a travel website. Companies can –- and do –- take advantage of buried terms in fine print to avoid obligating themselves to customers.

Montgomery used Opodo, an online travel site which partners with Rentalcars.com, to reserve a convertible for his stay in Fort Lauderdale.

But here’s what happened when he arrived at the rental facility:

I arrived in Fort Lauderdale to collect my car, and the agent was unable to rent to me because I didn’t possess a U.K. driver’s license. (I have a fully valid driver’s license from the state of Washington.) The Dollar Rent a Car agent apologized profusely, but said that the condition of rental was that I had to have a U.K. license in order to rent.

There is nothing in the rental agreement that says that I must possess a U.K. driver’s license. I phoned Rentalcars.com from the desk at Dollar and received no sympathy whatsoever. The only thing [the agent] was willing to do was to refund my prepaid rental. When I pressed him to direct me to the language in our rental agreement that stated that I must have a U.K. license, he admitted that there was no such language.


The best I could get out of him was that “the fare I had been quoted was only for international customers” and that “a U.K. license” was the proof of my international status. I told him that I was holding my U.K. passport in my hand, but that wasn’t good enough. All he could offer was a refund. He also told me that “99 percent of the customers booking in the U.K. possessed U.K. drivers’ licenses.

And because of an event in Fort Lauderdale, Montgomery had to pay more than double the cost of his original car rental to obtain a replacement rental car. “The walk-up price for even the cheapest economy car was over $850,” says Montgomery.

Montgomery attempted to file a complaint with Rentalcars.com through its website, only to receive the following response: “The details you have provided do not relate to a completed reservation. Please visit our Contact Us Page to find our phone number.”

At that point, he asked our advocates for help in getting a refund for the second car he had to rent.

Unfortunately for Montgomery, he missed some fine print in his rental agreement, which contained the following stipulation: “All drivers must hold a full and valid driving licence issued outside the USA, US Territories and Canada. Unfortunately it is not possible to rent this car on this package with a licence issued in the USA, US Territories or Canada.” (This language is reproduced from the U.K. original.)

Our advocate told Montgomery that because of this language, we weren’t going to be able to obtain a refund for him. Not having his U.K. driver’s license with him when he went to pick up the car invalidated his rental.

We are writing about his case to warn international travelers to carefully read their travel contracts to make sure that they comply with all the terms. Otherwise, like Montgomery, you may end up in a situation that we will have to treat as a Case Dismissed.


Jennifer Finger

Jennifer is the founder of KeenReader, an Internet-based freelance editing operation, as well as a certified public accountant. She is a senior writer for Elliott.org. Read more of Jennifer's articles here.

  • disqus_00YDCZxqDV

    “Due to an event The walk-up price for even the cheapest economy car was over $850” hence the rental agent probably getting a commission for finding the flimsiest of reasons to decline any prepaid reservation.

  • Lindabator

    not a flimsy reason — he purchased a reduced-rate rental ONLY valid for UK renters with a valid UK drivers license – don’t have one, don’t qualify – international rentals have the same stipulations for US rentals for US drivers

  • Alan Gore

    Florida is one of the most popular overseas destinations for the British, so there is a whole infrastructure of travel agencies, hotels and car rentals tailored just for them. I’m not sure where Opodo is based, but it quotes prices in EUR, making it a British or EU site. If LW wanted to rent using am American license, he should have used the regular US reservation site. This being outside the British tourist ecosystem, would probably have also saved money.

  • y_p_w

    I’ve helped a friend from overseas book a rental car. I was looking all around, and several of the major rental car agencies had direct booking options depending on where the renter was a legal resident. I suppose a driver license is their proof that one is a legal resident. I entered the country of residence for this friend. It was really odd. The base rates were lower, and on top of that it didn’t even register any of the typical taxes and fees.

    It was with Avis, and I just tried a sample booking and all I got was this:

    Your rate was calculated based on the information provided. Some modifications may change this rate.

  • KennyG

    Flimsiest of reasons?? You mean like not taking any personal responsibility for not actually having read the contract he agreed to? You mean blaming others for his lack of understanding that sometimes there are rules involved in renting a car, purchasing an airline ticket, or myriad other things that affect ones ability to qualify to rent, obtain special package pricing, pay or not pay certain fees and charges?

  • ctporter

    I have found that if you step away from the rental counter and call the rental car company or go online to book you can find a much lower rate than the rate quoted at the rental car desk

  • LeeAnneClark

    Well. I was all ready to blame the customer for not reading the fine print, until I went into the Opodo UK site myself, and realized that it is extremely difficult to even FIND the fine print to read!

    I had to go through the booking process, select a car, then several pages in, right before I would finalize the booking, I had to scroll down…down…down…below all the ads and stuff, I saw three very tiny words – “Terms and Conditions”. They don’t even look like a link…but they are, so I clicked them. I had to then scroll down until I saw “What you need a pick-up”, below other conditions. I had to click that to open it, then scroll down….down…down, several paragraphs down, until I saw “License Requirements”. In that section, the SIXTH paragraph says this:

    “All drivers must hold a full and valid driving licence issued outside the USA, US Territories and Canada. Unfortunately it is not possible to rent this car on this package with a licence issued in the USA, US Territories or Canada.”

    Come freaking on. WHO is going to spend that much time trying to find and read every single possible term and condition? I’ve never heard of that kind of license requirement, so I certainly wouldn’t know to go hunting for it.

    And having it appear on the rental contract AFTER HE’S ALREADY THERE is absurd. He’s ALREADY THERE. He already pre-paid for the car.

    Sorry folk, but those of you blaming this guy are completely off-base. This requirement is obviously pretty important, and should be disclosed right up front, clearly, and maybe even with a required checkbox before they take his money. To do what they are doing is scammy to the extreme.

  • LeeAnneClark

    Did you visit the Opodo site? It’s almost impossible to FIND this term in the fine print before he completed the rental online.

    To have it appear in the contract once he’s already paid for it and arrived there to get it is ridiculous. It should have been CLEARLY disclosed right upfront. And it wasn’t.

  • BubbaJoe123

    I book US car rentals using the rental companies overseas sites (hertz.co.uk, hertz.de, etc.) with some frequency, as they’re often cheaper than booking through the US site. I’m careful to read the fine print, however, to ensure that there isn’t a requirement that, to book through country X’s site, you need to reside in country X.

  • Noah Kimmel

    First, not going to “blame” the guy, but will add my perspective. I really do feel bad for the OP.

    Some companies price differently overseas. Try buying an intra-asia airline ticket when you are there vs. when you are in US. US Customers are marked up significantly. Airlines saw people gaming system and eventually also added residency requirements. Hotels do similar. It is the same thing for car rental. The OP likely knew that when he booked on an international site as I imagine he compared prices given that he booked through an OTA, and a smaller one at that.

    When you get a discount rate, you need to know the rate rules and restrictions. Sadly, the OP is stuck in the middle, but it’s not Dollar who should be responsible, it is the 3rd party site who didn’t make restrictions clear. Why should Dollar lose money because an OTA didn’t disclose until the 6th page? To your point about checking a box, Not being in the head of all customers, how do they know which terms should go in bold? Is it the taxes you didn’t realize were there? mileage provisions? damage provisions? rate restrictions? etc. And is the OTA supposed to code a different site for each rate product type from each company?

    To your other point, I don’t see how it matters if “HE’S ALREADY THERE” it matters what he agreed to buy and the restrictions on that special price. When a restaurant says “hospital employees 5% off” Well, staying in the hospital doesn’t make me an employee entitled to the discount, whether I am there or not. Pre-payment doesn’t change it either – he wasn’t entitled to that pricing. You can find plenty of corporate discount codes online, and book a prepaid GE or AAA or IBM or other rate at a hotel, but if they ask for your ID and you aren’t an employee, you don’t get the rate, even if you pre-paid. Same thing here, except the OTA was less clear about the rate restrictions.

    On some level, consumers bear responsibility, even if the products have gotten quite complex. A car rental is a $20,000 asset, sold in an ultra-competitive, intermediaried, commodity market, the best prices rarely are simple and all inclusive.

    Don’t get me wrong, it is a shame that he couldn’t use it, and it stinks that the walk up rate was so different. I really do feel bad for him and don’t want to victim blame. I doubt there was malicious intent. I also find the difference between international passport and international drivers license an interesting wrinkle different from most claims on the site. Tough way to learn the lesson.

  • Alan Gore

    In the UK there is still a vast preference for low-budget package vacations, somewhat the way it was with us right after WW II. Think of British vacationers as being like our students on spring break. They pack into a few specific places, like Benidorm or south Florida, where everything is set up their way with binge drinking bars, greasy pub food and beaches where they can soak up megasieverts of Frida sunshine before heading back on the standing-room-only class on Ryanair to get their melanoma taken care of on National Health.

  • y_p_w

    Depends on the situation. Perhaps not a rental car, but one time I walked up at a motel and got a cheaper rate than I saw online. And I have personal experience with rental car rates, taxes, etc being vastly different depending on where the driver is a resident.

  • y_p_w

    I’ve even seen different rates from a major rental car agency in the US booked on their website depending on what country they were legal residents. I just tried playing around on the Avis US website, and for the same two day rental at an airport I got a variety of base rates (as well as different lists of available vehicle types), and several countries where there were no taxes or airport fees listed. For some countries an LDW was automatically added as a fee.

    What I didn’t see was any fine print about what documentation would be needed to prove residency.

  • Bill___A

    Most countries don’t allow you to have a foreign driving permit and live there. Also, most places don’t allow you to have more than one license. He was doing something weird…booking from the UK with a UK passport and an American driver’s license. I agree that companies should not try to hide the “fine print” but if he were doing the “normal” thing, he wouldn’t have got caught up in it.

  • Lindabator

    looking on the US site – it is always in the description of documents, credit cards, etc

  • LeeAnneClark

    But this person was in the UK. I lookedon the UK site, and my detailed findings are in a comment below. It was NOT obvious, and I had to dig dig dig to find it.

  • LeeAnneClark

    That may be true, but I certainly wouldn’t intuitively know that it’s considered “abnormal” to have a driver’s license from two countries. Obviously, if one is a dual citizen, it’s POSSIBLE to have a driver’s license from both countries…he did! And he’s not the only person who has dual citizenship…and some of them might even have homes in both countries. So I don’t see how it’s weird.

    Even if it is uncommon, that doesn’t absolve Opodo from having to disclosing it more clearly, especially given the financial consequences to a customer who doesn’t know about it.

  • LeeAnneClark

    Okay. Interesting. Not my idea of a fun vacation, but to each his own I guess.

    Doesn’t change my mind about the fact that this guy got screwed by undisclosed restrictions on his rental. :)

  • LeeAnneClark

    All that being said, I still believe that they should have worked with him. He was clearly not trying to “get one over” on anyone – he HAS both a US and a UK driver’s licence, and obviously if he’d known he had to have his UK one with him, he would have brought it. The fact that this restriction was so difficult to find should have been enough for the rental agency to give him the car. It appears to not be any kind of *legal* requirement – just a way for the company to ensure people who live in the US don’t take advantage of a deal not meant for them. His passport should have sufficed.

  • y_p_w

    Passports don’t suffice to show residency. A lot of expats have them.

    Granted a driver license is kind of a gray area since one could leave but it’s still valid until expiration.

  • Mel65

    If he didn’t have it with him to present it how woukd anyone know he hold a valid one? Are you suggesting that they just take his word for it? That’s silliness.

  • Annie M

    Why are you looking at the Avis website when he booked through OPODO? You need to recreate the booking the way ti was done.

  • Annie M

    He most likely booked it through the UK site because it was cheaper than anything he cold find here. If the writer found it quickly, it had to have been printed on the receipt somewhere.

  • Annie M

    Not necessarily if there is a big event going on.

  • Annie M

    Then why didn’t he book on the U.S. site? I am betting because it was more expensive than the UK site.

  • Annie M

    Passports don’t prove the guy has a legitimate UK license to drive a car.

  • Annie M

    You are so right. And they are also willing to stay in 2 star hotels because they are affordable to stay for 2 or 3 weeks since they get a lot of vacation time. I once stayed in an awful resort in Jamaica that was disgusting. The place was full of Brits. When I asked them how they liked the place, they all loved it – they said it was the only place they could afford to stay for 3 weeks.

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    We have been on tours where the US travelers were charged much more than the travelers from other countries…the differences ranged from $ 500 to $ 1,500.

    I have international business associates that have come to visit Southern California (i.e. Disney, Lego, etc.) and we have went over to visit them. Their hotel rates were cheaper (i.e. they booked on the Marriott website of their country) than the rates that we could get.

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    The real problem is poor software design and programming. It is my guess that

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    It wasn’t Dollar that made the mistake nor should they eat it. The problem was caused by Opodo, an OTA…they failed to disclose ‘clearly’ that the rate was for individuals with UK driver licenses and to inform the OP that they need to have their UK driver license with them.

    I know a business associate that is an US citizen but lives and work in another country…half of his family are US citizens and the other half are not…he knows that there are different requirements for members of his family when they travel to the US and other countries.

    My question is the OP a seasoned traveler given his dual citizenship and etc? If ‘Yes’ then he should know that rates, policies, etc. are different between country websites. If ‘No’ then he should have used a professional brick & mortar travel agent for this trip (he could learn the ropes first then he could book his future rental on his own).

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    How could the rental company verify the OP was the actual renter without his UK driver license?

  • LeeAnneClark

    “Eat it”? There was nothing to eat! There was a car that was properly rented using Opodo’s site, by someone allowed to rent that car. Dollar would have gotten paid the same as they would have if he’d happened to have that little card with him.

  • Mark

    Not quite correct. Most have a transition period (~12 months) where you can drive on your foreign license.

    I’ve seen other rental companies that accept broader range of proofs (e.g. flight tickets / bank statements / bills). This would have been the more pragmatic approach here, that caters for all scenarios.

  • LeeAnneClark

    Because he was in the UK when he booked it! When you are in the UK, you will automatically be directed to the UK site. I had to go search for the UK site in order to see it, as when I tried to access Opodo it put me on the US site. Sure, it’s likely that the UK deal was cheaper than the US one, but he probably wouldn’t have known that, as he wouldn’t have been on the US site.

  • LeeAnneClark

    He didn’t need a legitimate UK license to *drive* the car – a US license legally allowed him to drive it.

    Again, while the fine print did say that a UK license was required, the fact that the fine print was insanely hard to even find should have been enough reason for Dollar to be just a little bit flexible and give him the car. Clearly, the only reason for the UK license restriction is to prove that you’re a UK resident…and he was able to prove that.

    This was a case of the company being unwilling to bend a little bit in order to show good customer service.

  • LeeAnneClark

    Finally! Somebody else who sees it my way! :-)

    You nailed it. There was zero reason for Dollar to be so rigid. There was no legal requirement for that UK license, and there was no reason for them to not show a little flexibility in the interest of good customer service.

    And now they’ve likely lost a customer forever. I’m sure he’ll never rent with them again. Very short-sighted.

    What I don’t understand is why so many people in this forum are agreeing with Dollar’s blind rigidity here. Christopher often says that companies should be willing to show some flexibility in non-legal-based rules in order to show good customer service. So why, in this particular case, in a situation in which it’s so obvious that it was extremely difficult to even *find* that buried rule, is everyone suddenly going all “rules is rules” on us? Weird…

  • LeeAnneClark

    He had a US driver’s license, plus a UK passport. Why that’s not good enough for everyone here is beyond me, but…I’m done making my case. :)

  • justanotherguy

    I disagree. There are other ways they could have verified, like asking for his international DL # at the time of the reservation.

    If companies are going to nitpick based on their disclaimers and small print, they should be held to the same standard. The requirement was that he hold a non-US DL, not that he present it at the time of the rental. Is it tomfoolery? Certainly, but the rental company is the one that wrote the terms, not this poor sap.

  • y_p_w

    I’m responding to a comment about international rentals.

    Since when have all comments on Elliot.org been specifically responsive to the original letter writer’s issue. If you look there are comments about foreig driver permits, inter-Asia airline tickets, Florida package tours, etc.

  • y_p_w

    Doesn’t “hold” in that context mean to have in one’s direct possession? And inherent in the message is being able to prove it.

  • justanotherguy

    Not necessarily- if I apply for a job that says I must “hold” a bachelor’s degree, I don’t think any interviewer would expect me to bring my diploma to the interview.

    To my broader point- if the company wanted him to present his non-US DL at the time of rental, then that should have been the disclaimer language they used. Joe Consumer doesn’t draft the argle-bargle companies hide in the fine print- if there’s an ambiguity or a loophole, that should be the company’s problem, since they’re the one setting the requirements and drafting the language.

  • y_p_w

    It’s kind of a gray area. If he moved to the U.K., he may have been legally required to surrender his Washington DL to get a U.K. one. They would have no means to figure it out if he refused to produce it though. The opposite would have been true. Anyone moving to Washington would be required to surrender an out of state (including foreign) DL.

    I’m not sure what the law is in Washington though on surrendering a Washington DL when getting an out of state DL.

  • LonnieC

    And I think that this case is different than many we see because the OP had a UK driver’s license, and simply didn’t find the requirement when he made the reservation. If he’d been trying to game the system, he deserves to pay the new higher fee. If, as here, he made a very understandable error, the rental company should have helped him.

  • Lifetime Expat

    Internationally, you are allowed to hold multiple licenses, you only have to surrender when moving within the US. I currently hold Colorado, Qatar, Thailand, Czech Republic, and UK Licenses.

  • joycexyz

    Nope. The rental contract stipulated that he needed a valid driver’s license issued outside the USA. The takeaway is: read the contract carefully!

  • Blamona

    If he wanted the U.K. (Discounted) price he should have U.K. Documents. If he wanted to pay the US price use US documents. Why didn’t he just bring both? Common sense would dictate documents should match price you’re on

    I’ve seen different prices for same site different requirements for ex in Peru. Airfare for Peruvians cheaper than us visitors. Had to be paid with Peruvian issued credit card.

    Same with rental cars–want U.K. Price bring U.K. Documents

  • joycexyz

    A renter always needs to show the required license when renting a car anywhere at any time.

  • justanotherguy

    A renter always needs to show a valid DL to rent, which he did. He just happened to hold two different DLs.

    Is this a common situation? Probably not. Could the company have foreseen this happening? Maybe, maybe not. But only one party to this transaction had control over the rental rules- the company. The renter shouldn’t be punished because the company’s terms weren’t specific enough.

  • LeeAnneClark

    YES! That’s the point I’ve been trying to make all along, that people just don’t seem to be able to see. The OP made a completely understandable, if not thoroughly predictable, error. That restriction was so hard to find, and to hold him to it when he had other documentation proving he met the intent of the requirement of being a UK resident, even if it wasn’t the *exact one* their fine print asked for.

    Why people are holding him to the fire on this murky, ridiculously rigid rule is beyond me…especially in a forum that is usually so compassionate to customers, and unforgiving of companies who use fine print loopholes to enrich themselves.

  • LeeAnneClark

    Um, no. He booked it on the UK site because when you’re in the UK, that’s the site you would be directed to. He would have had to actively search for the US site, and most people wouldn’t even know to do that. I doubt he even had any idea there WAS a different US site.

  • LeeAnneClark

    Agree completely!

  • cscasi

    Once again, because the terms and conditions under which he rented the vehicle states he had to have his out of USA license in order to get that price. That was the rule, like it or not.

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    I have rented cars for 20+ years and I can’t recall a time when I wasn’t asked for my driver license at the rental counter and/or the ‘exit checkpoint booth’.

    The rental company needs to confirm that ‘Keith Montgomery of London’ is actually picking up the car…’Keith Montgomery of Seattle’ could cause the rental car company to question if this is the correct renter. Just think of it…renters with ‘common’ names of Smith, Miller, etc…someone with the same name could go to the rental company and steal a car.

    Another reason is liability…a renter could have a good driver license at the time of rental but not at the time of rental (i.e. it expired; a traffic violation; etc.).

    I purchased a duplicate copy of my driver license and carry my two (2) drivers licenses with me along with a xerox copy of my license in case if I lose one or both driver licenses.

  • y_p_w

    No, but any company would reserve the right to ask for proof of graduation. I’ve actually brought certified copies of my transcripts and proof of attendance/degree with me to an interview.

    When you’re renting a car they’re generally going to ask to see at stuff at the time of rental. In this case “hold” means possess on your person.

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    ‘…the rental company should have helped him…’

    It wasn’t the rental car company’s fault…the party that should have help him is the OTA that he used…they failed to disclose and/or was transparent with the requirements of the rates.

  • Mel65

    So, he puts in a DL number into the reservation, but doesn’t bring it. Still not validation. What if it’s expired? What if it wasn’t a legit number; how would they know? What if it’s suspended in Europe? You choose to purchase a “deal” for a specific group of people, expect to prove you belong to that group. I get a military discount at many places and I ALWAYS have my military ID to prove it rather than saying, “well I TOLD you we’re retired military already.”

  • justanotherguy

    Nice red herring- Having a valid DL at the time of the actual rental is a completely separate issue- and for the record he presented a (presumably) valid DL at the time of rental.

    On a separate note- 20+ years is a long time to rent a car- it may be better to purchase if you need one for that long.

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    It is my guess that the address on the rental agreement was his London address. The rate for the rental was for individuals with a valid UK driver license (or a non-US & Canada).

    Showing a Washington State DL with a rental agreement address of London with the rate based upon non-US and Canada DL will make most companies think ‘scammers’.

    There are people from Southern California that move to Arizona but they keep a their California license so that they can get the Southern California Resident Rates to Lego, Disney, etc.

  • justanotherguy

    In this case “hold” wasn’t defined in the terms. If they wanted him to bring his non-US DL, they should have said so at the time of the online booking- they certainly had the power or ability to request it and appropriately notify renters. Their failure to do so is just that- their failure. Not his.

  • justanotherguy

    The company may think scammer- but he complied with the letter of the their rules and requirements. and oh by the way, had a British passport to prove residency.

  • justanotherguy

    If they wanted him to present specific proof of non-US residency (i.e. the non-US DL) at the time of rental- they should have said so. When I reserve a hotel online using my AAA discount, sometimes they say proof of AAA membership may be required at time of check-in- so I bring my AAA card. If this gentleman was told at the time of booking that he was required to present his non-US DL, presumably he would have.

    The company had the power and ability to put that requirement in writing, but didn’t. They simply assumed that the holder of a non-US DL would only have that DL, and no other and so would naturally bring the non-US DL with them. Their assumption was wrong- the renter shouldn’t be punished for the company’s mistake.

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    “On a separate note- 20+ years is a long time to rent a car- it may be better to purchase if you need one for that long.”

    Was this your attempt at humor or your ignorance that you don’t know that there are people that have jobs where they travel by air and they rent car when they arrive at their destination?

  • justanotherguy

    I was mocking your grammar; your initial sentence was ambiguous.

    But yeah, I had no idea that people even have jobs, never mind that jobs sometimes require travel and car rental.

  • ArizonaRoadWarrior

    No he didn’t…he didn’t present a non-US/Canada driver license. Just because he provided his UK passport doesn’t mean that he has an UK driver license.

  • justanotherguy

    He wasn’t required to present a non-US DL- he was just required to hold one. He did- it just happened to be in his sock draw, at his home, in the UK. Still complying with the specific terms the company set forth.

    If the company wanted to him to bring his non-US DL, they should have said so explicitly. Having drafted this adhesion contract, the company is bound by it’s terms, and is further bound to have all ambiguities resolved in the manner most favorable to the non-drafting party.

  • Mark

    I can guarantee you that if he had a “pay on collection” vs “prepaid” rate, they wouldn’t have kicked up a stink here.

  • Fishplate

    I sure am glad you aren’t on my jury.

  • joycexyz

    But they were specific–“All drivers must hold a full and valid driving licence issued outside
    the USA, US Territories and Canada. Unfortunately it is not possible to
    rent this car on this package with a licence issued in the USA, US
    Territories or Canada.” This stipulation may have been in fine print, but it’s all fine print. Caveat emptor!

  • ctporter

    I tried to make it clear that this actually HAS worked for ME, and not trying to imply this is always true. It does help to know some there are options to TRY even when there is a large event going on.

  • Kristiana Lee

    Passport doesn’t necessarily equal residency. My husband and I both have dual citizenship but we haven’t lived anywhere but the US since 1999 and 1977 respectively.

  • LeeAnneClark

    And the fact that this “rule” was completely buried in arcane fine print, requiring multiple clicks and searching to find it, doesn’t affect your belief that “rules are rules” and this guy should lose his money because he didn’t go digging to find the land mine that might torpedo his rental?

    Sorry, but I still see it as a big company using a hidden loophole to screw a guy out of his money.

  • Mel65

    It’s NOT an assumotuon though. EVERYONE has to present a D Lat rental. It is a requirement. Therefore if you’re renting an iternational rate, it shoukdnt have to be stated to bring the DL that allows it. He was somehow trying to get sonwrhong he wasnt entitled to IMHO.

  • PsyGuy

    Wow, just wow.

  • PsyGuy

    That wasn’t flimsy, it served the rental company of course, but it was a special price with restrictions that were published. It could just as easily be argued that the LW was trying to take advantage of the company.

  • PsyGuy

    Agreed

  • PsyGuy

    It’s not proving residency it’s proving you are an international traveler and the only document the agency would accept is a foreign drivers license.

  • PsyGuy

    Or just travel with all your various pieces of identification.

  • PsyGuy

    Now that is flimsy.

  • PsyGuy

    I agree

  • PsyGuy

    That could be any number someone makes up. Emphasis on “HELD”, as in actually holding, and having in your possession.

  • PsyGuy

    Employers would require you at sometime before actually getting the job that you produce the actual degree. That’s what happened here when he made the booking 9the interview0 they accepted that he had one based on his assurances. Once it came time to get the keys much like the actual job the LW had to produce the actual documents.

  • PsyGuy

    No it’s his the LW had to pay more.

  • wilcoxon

    I’ve never seen a stipulation such as this when I’ve rented (domestically in the US or internationally). It doesn’t really surprise me but I do find it a slimy tactic.

  • wilcoxon

    I disagree. He booked the rate he found. Just because it was through the UK site does NOT mean that it requires a UK license. He had his passport (which should have been enough to prove he was from the UK) and a valid driver’s license – that should have been it. I completely agree with the others calling shenanigans.

  • wilcoxon

    See Lifetime Expat’s response above. If you have to surrender a foreign license varies between countries. I have no idea if the OP has residences in both countries (which I would expect entitles him to licenses in both) or if the UK requires surrendering foreign driver’s license or not.

  • wilcoxon

    But the passport does show the address of residence at the time the passport was issued. My wife is a dual-citizen and has two passports but they both show our US address.

  • Mel65

    But there was a disconnect between the British passport and an American drivers license. So I definitely think the OP was either trying to game the system or just goofed. But if you’re renting a car under the guise of a European citizen, you need to bring your European driver’s license.

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