A diabetic episode, a shattered lamp — but no sympathy from Radisson Blu

By | January 2nd, 2017

What do a diabetic episode and a hotel’s expensive taste in lamps have to do with consumer advocacy? A lot, if you’re Sharon Kimball.

Her misadventure at the Radisson Blu Style Hotel in Vienna City Center and the drama that followed underscore the importance of persistence, and the need for strategy, when something goes wrong on your trip. It also raises several troubling questions that are not easily answered.

Kimball and her husband recently checked into the Radisson Blu with their older son and his wife.

“I’m diabetic, and while we were watching a World Cup game at the hotel bar, I began to feel low blood sugar symptoms,” says Kimball. “I went upstairs to our room to check my glucose levels and drink some juice, but I had apparently waited too long and was a bit shaky. I went to sit down in the armchair in the room and sort of fell back into it, and it rocked back against a floor lamp.”

That lamp turned out to be an expensive accessory.

“The next morning I noticed that the lamp was damaged, so when we checked out I told the front desk people about it and apologized,” she says. “To my dismay, the hotel charged us $540 for breaking the lamp.”

Kimball asked the hotel to consider removing the charge. After all, it had been an accident, not a drunken rampage.

“But they said there was nothing they could do,” she says.

Next, she emailed Radisson corporate and explained the circumstances. The company replied that the damage was “her fault” and they declined to reverse the charge.

Related story:   The biggest complaint mistake you'll ever make

Reality check: The damage was her fault and she was responsible. But it was also an accident, and $540 seems like a lot to pay for a lamp.

When her son heard about Radisson’s intransigence, he posted negative reviews on TripAdvisor, Facebook and Twitter explaining the family’s disappointment.


“Soon afterwards, my son received an email from Radisson, chiding him for the negative reviews and complaining that I should have emailed them first and given them a chance to resolve the incident,” she says. “He replied by forwarding to them their email to me that declined any assistance.”

Shortly after that, Radisson agreed to refund the charge in exchange for her son deleting the negative reviews.

“I would never have thought to use social media in that way. I was quite intrigued at the power it gives consumers who have an unresolved grievance with a business,” she says, adding, “And who needs $540 lamps in a hotel room, anyway?”

To which I say: Spend 16 years in Vienna and you’ll understand why $540 lamps are necessary. But that’s a topic for another day.

I love this story because it’s a reminder that consumers have more power than they can imagine. I’m a little surprised that TripAdvisor was an accessory to this, since they take a dim view of guests who delete unflattering reviews in exchange for certain considerations. But I’m also happy that Kimball didn’t get stuck with a $540 bill.

Unfortunately, someone will pay that bill, and something tells me these costs are eventually passed onto other guests in the long run.

This case raises all sorts of related issues. Should guests be responsible for everything in their room? What about normal wear and tear? Is it ethical to leverage TripAdvisor or other user-generated review sites to get what you want, even if you don’t deserve it?

Related story:   Here’s a cautionary tale about naming your own price for a hotel

But by far the biggest takeaway is this: You, the consumer, have much more power than you realize. And I would also urge you to use that power wisely.

Should Radisson have refunded Sharon Kimball for the broken lamp?

View Results

Loading ... Loading ...


  • mdy2k1

    Goodness, I hate everything about this article (still love you and your site).

    Intentionality is not an excuse to avoid restitution.

  • Lee

    I find the whole story unfortunate. Consumers should not get to use a form of blackmail to right what they consider a wrong (a “right” in this case I don’t believe exists other than in the mind of the hotel guest who broke the lamp) – I am a bit surprised this article seems to encourage such use of social media.

    Tripadvisor is far from a pristine business given they have zero oversight over reviews (whether posted by actual guests or shills, etc) – and other unseemly practices (i.e., advertising illegal rentals as vacation rentals in various cities) –

    Sorry you found yourself sympathetic in this situation. You are correct, I am sure, that the costs of such items are passed onto all other guests as the responsible parties evade paying based on this sort of behavior by the guest here in question.

  • Kristiana Lee

    Respect is a two way street. This woman destroyed hotel property, refused to pay for it, then her son blackmailed Radisson into removing the charge. Did this family treat Radisson with respect?

  • Rebecca

    Accidents are, by definition, accidents. Not on purposes. When I was in college, I became violently ill. I had to have a friend drive me to the ER, because my temperature had spiked to nearly 104 and knew I couldn’t drive. And I threw up all over the poor guys car. I tried to make it out the window/door, but I didn’t make all of it. Yes, it was embarrassing, but just because I was sick, it was accidental, and he had a 15 year old Bonneville, didn’t mean I wasn’t responsible. I got puke all over his car. So, I paid to have a really good detail, with tip it cost almost $200. Life happens, and sometimes it costs money when it does.

  • Pat

    The right thing to do would have been at checkout, to not only tell that the lamp was broken, but to also say that they would pay for the repair or replacement. Yes it was an accident, but the guest was responsible for the accident and the hotel should not bear the costs. Also by offering to cover the cost, the hotel might have been willing to cover some of the cost.

  • FQTVLR

    I am appalled at this post.
    First at the family at not going up with her when the lownership blood sugar symptoms started.
    Then, again, at the family for basically blackmailing Radisson.
    And finally at you for appearing to condone the blackmail.

  • JewelEyed

    If you’re feeling hypoglycemic, better to just ask the bartender to give you a glass of orange juice because you’re feeling shaky and stay seated. Sure, the financial cost was a steep one, but even steeper would have been the cost to her health if she had taken a bad fall and cracked her skull.

  • Jeff W.

    I agree 100%. The lesson the article conveys is to not accept personal responsibility for one’s actions and instead resort to blackmail and slander.to get your way. For shame…

  • AJPeabody

    The OP did not indicate that she told anyone she was having a medical problem when she went to her room. Low blood sugar can easily impair judgement. It was a foolish act to leave a populated area for an elevator, a hotel corridor, and an otherwise unoccupied room while the sugar clock is ticking. Any number of truly tragic results could have occurred. A simple, “I need sugar now fast” to her fellow Cup watchers would have been a lot safer, but I’ll wager her sugar was too low to figure that out.

  • BubbaJoe123

    Is she responsible for the lamp she broke? Yes. This isn’t normal wear and tear where the sink faucet comes off in your hand. Even though it wasn’t intentional damage, she did break it. That said, $540 seems REALLY high for a lamp, particularly given that Radisson isn’t exactly going down to Eddie’s House of Lighting and picking one out. If they had charged her $100-200, I would have been 100% on Radisson’s side.

  • FQTVLR

    I am the only non-diabetic in my family. Even the beginning symptoms are clear to everyone even remotely familiar with diabetes. It does impair judgement but not that of people with the diabetic. I doubt she got up without saying she was going to check her blood sugar levels–simply human nature to mention this to family.

  • FQTVLR

    As an aside what World Cup were they watching? I am confused…

  • Bill___A

    This is not really the type of story or outcome that makes me happy. I think, for the most part, the other commenters have pointed out the reasons why.

  • Jeff W.

    Radisson Blu is an upscale chain within the Radisson family. It is the type of hotel that probably does not immediately come to mind when you hear “Radisson”.

    Is $450 high for a lamp? At an upscale hotel in Vienna, who knows. I doubt the lamp was purchased at Ikea.

  • John Keahey

    She broke it, whatever the reason. She should pay, for crying out loud. Normal wear and tear? No, of course.

  • AAGK

    Maybe the lamp cost $540 new but used a million times in a hotel room, I bet it could not be sold at a garage sale for more than $20 now. To bill her for a new one is ridiculous.

  • MF

    Although the case was resolved in the OP’s favor, half/half would have been fair, IMO.

  • Chris_In_NC

    An accident does NOT excuse Kimball from being financially responsible for damages. If she were questioning the charges and attempted to negotiate a settlement, I would have more sympathy for Kimball. But what is deplorable is the fact that Kimball feels NO responsibility to help pay for the damage. In fact, I feel like Kimball feels like a saint because she reported it to the hotel. I guess she gets partial credit because she could have totally denied her responsibility. To then use social media to blackmail the hotel into waiving the charges is a misuse of social media, especially when she was indeed responsible for the damage. That is the difference between this case and others where the traveler was inaccurately or incorrectly accused of damages.

  • Meredith Putvin

    As a diabetic, I am cognizant of the fact that swings like this can and do happen. She should have, at the least, had glucose tablets in her purse. A small tube of 10 tablet only costs around a $1 and can be refilled very cost effectively from a large bottle. I do this as a matter of habit even though I rarely have a bad swing like this. I had a sugar drop at my place of employment and even if I didn’t have them in my purse, my boss keeps a large number in stock.

  • Dutchess

    Wow, you break a lamp you should pay for it. Why should the hotel eat this cost? If you got in a car accident and was hit by someone saying “I had a diabetic episode” would you let them walk off and say, “Nevermind, I’ll pay to fix my car myself!” Yeah, probably not. So why would you expect the hotel to do the same thing. Shameful using social media to shame a business into bending to your selfishness. Shameful.

  • Dutchess

    Hotel lamps and accessories are expensive because they have to be really well made to put up with wear and tear from customers. The LW must have hit it pretty hard to break it. She should pay up, accident or not.

  • MarkKelling

    Having diabetes, or any other disease, does not give you permission to break something and then say “Sorry, I’m not paying for what I broke because of my disease.” (I have diabetes, and I have never used that as an excuse to get out of anything.)

    While the cost of the lamp in this case does sound high, (it is definitely more than I would pay for any lamp) it is what the hotels claims it will cost to replace and not knowing anything about the lamp I can’t argue the cost. The OP could have negotiated with the hotel and possibly arrived at a more agreeable amount to have to pay instead of jumping on social media and basically forcing the hotel into paying ransom.

    Guests at any hotel from a Motel 6 budget up to a 6 star one where everything is gold pated are responsible for breakage. Normal wear and tear where things stop working are not the responsibility of the guest. What is the difference? In the case of the lamp in question knocking it over where it is visibly broken is not wear and tear. The switch no longer working in the lamp that was not knocked over is wear and tear and is the hotel’s responsibility.

  • MarkKelling

    So that is supposed be the basis for deciding to pay for something or not? If company makes more than a certain level of income then it is OK to not pay for what you owe?

    GM and Ford each posted after tax profits of around $10 Billion for last year. Does that mean I can stop paying for my auto loans because, hey, they made enough money so my little amount owed to them doesn’t even show on their profit and loss statements?

    Carlson is not doing so well this year. They sold off a large chunk of their properties to a Chinese investment firm. Their income revenue from their previously highly profitable European hotels is way down due to the terrorist attacks. While I doubt the cost of a lamp will prevent them from going bankrupt, you broke it you pay for it.

  • MarkKelling

    Guess it could have been 2014 and it just took that long for the events to play out for this.

  • Patrica

    I find it difficult to believe that the depreciated value , the value of a USED bought-in-bulk lamp was THAT much. Lovely Crossbill lamps are around $200 and are often seen at Goodwill for $5…. Perhaps there is the cost of overhead in replacing the lamp… but this just is way too high. Also, the bribe IF they recanted and deleted their post on TA just smacks of creepy creepy bad. Have always had a good valuation of Radisson…. could they POSSIBLY have wanted an “addendum” to the post instead of a deletion??

  • MarkKelling

    Well, yeah, now that it is broken it is probably worth $20 or less.

  • Patrica

    “Radisson agreed to refund the charge in exchange for her son deleting the negative reviews.” does not mean the son blackmailed them. I have more frequently found that the hotel/restaurant demand that the post be deleted and I’m wondering at this interpretation..

  • Patrica

    “Radisson agreed to refund the charge in exchange for her son deleting the negative reviews.” does not mean the son blackmailed them. I have more frequently found that the hotel/restaurant demand that the post be deleted and I’m wondering at this interpretation..worried as to which was it..

  • AAGK

    I meant before it was broken. I doubt the market value from a constantly used Radison lamp is breaking records at Sotheby’s.

  • AAGK

    I agee that she didn’t owe them the cost of a brand new lamp but instead the depreciated value. Lamps can be very expensive and $540 would be reasonable if new.

  • AAGK

    Since the hotels buy expensive lamps then they may want to remind housekeeping to dust under them every once in a while.

  • AAGK

    I agree. The article didn’t mention blackmail. To the contrary, it extended a courtesy and asked for a courtesy in return. The family could’ve kept the review up but it would’ve been moot since the hotel waived the cost. I would’ve removed the review voluntarily if I no longer had to pay.

  • Barthel

    I would have checked out without mentioning the lamp.

  • JewelEyed

    I guess it depends on how old that lamp was. Maybe they’d just replaced it when it broke. Who knows.

  • JewelEyed

    Yeah, I’m sure that would have gone well.

  • Mel LeCompte Jr.

    I’m a diabetic, also. In a pinch, even without my meter I may improvise. If she was at the hotel bar and felt she needed juice, she could have easily ordered it from the bar. When I get the ‘woozies’, the last thing I would want to do is travel throughout an unfamiliar building.

  • BubbaJoe123

    I’m skeptical about the replacement cost…

  • BubbaJoe123

    I’ve stayed at a couple of Radisson Blu locations. It’s upscale for a Radisson, but not really upscale in any absolute sense (i.e. not Four Seasons, Park Hyatt, St. Regis, etc.).

    Lamp price seems high to me, although certainly not Ikea level. :)

  • michael anthony

    Perhaos. But the OPs comment about the lamp being too expensive for a hotel, rubbed me the wrong way. For all we know, the lamps in this hotel were unique to that hotel and region. Thus the price, which some deem as excessive, may be justifiable.

  • Koholaz

    First, I can’t believe that the sort of furnishings in hotels include lamps that are that expensive. There are websites where you can buy discarded furnishings and that stuff is all run of the mill quality. Second, do hotels not have insurance for this type of thing? Do they charge every customer for evlery single damaged article? That sounds like a car rental MO.

  • FQTVLR

    I thought so to except Chris referred to them as “recently checked in”.

  • DChamp56

    I was brought up to take ownership of my actions (whether intentional or not). To not even offer to split the cost with the hotel is so very wrong.
    What if she had been in a car accident? Would she have asked the other car owner to pay for the damage she caused, because she had a diabetic episode?
    It’s no wonder that people’s children now believe actions have no consequences, instead of teaching about right and wrong.

  • kittymocha

    As “Pickwix” says below, I’m sure also they have insurance to cover this or should have anyway. Yes, this was an accident but she could have just said nothing and it might have been a long time before the hotel found the damage. I had a similar incident many years ago at a hotel in Waikiki. I put my heavy suitcase on a dresser that had a lamp on it. My suitcase caught the cord somehow and down went the lamp. We were getting ready to check out so I went to the front desk and “fessed up” to what happened and said I would pay for the lamp (cheap pottery, mass produced one). I sat down and waited while a couple guys went up to the room. They came back and told me not to worry about it!!! I thanked them and went on my way. If you’ve ever seen ads for sale of hotel furniture when they pull it out of the building to replace and upgrade, it’s not high end stuff. I’m sure the more high end hotels do get a better grade of furniture but still mass produced.

  • Ben

    Likely would be less than her deductible.

  • Lindabator

    you’ve never visited the RB VIenna, then. this is a 78 room boutique hotel with stylish and artistic touches in the rooms – not a motel 6 with a $19.99 Walmart special

  • Lindabator

    actually, very true in this case – this is a boutique hotel which has very upscale and artistic touches throughout, including the lamps

  • Fishplate

    Why shouldn’t the hotel be made whole? They deserve a lamp that matches the rest of the hotel, not a check.

  • Tricia K

    I’m sympathetic to the circumstances of the damaged lamp, but it could just as easily been kids messing around or any other number of circumstances. The appropriate thing to do upfront is offer to cover the damages. Once they know the circumstances, I think it’s only decent for the hotel to say it isn’t necessary, but it would also be easy for a guest to lie. As for using social media to shame them into a refund, I’m not ok with it. We all get angry when hotels and car rental companies refuse to deal with someone as long as their negative post is up, so I have to ask, how is this different? I don’t like passive aggressive moves on anyone’s part, and that’s what this is. I wish she had contacted Carlson directly, as suggested in the forum, and then posted the review if they said no. Generally speaking, Carlson is a good parent company and I am surprised they said no to a refund.

  • Dutchess

    Okay, not blackmail, extortion. Doesn’t make it any better.

  • BubbaJoe123

    It’s a perfectly nice hotel. Certainly not top end, which would be the Sacher, (where I have stayed), the Bristol, Park Hyatt (also stayed there), etc. It’s half the price, or less, of those, and for a reason.

    For US comparison, it’s along the lines of a W – perfectly respectable, and with a high “style factor,” but not a luxury hotel.

  • gpx21dlr

    “You break it, you pay for it!” or in a SF Chinatown souvenir shop, “you breakee, you payee.”

  • MarkKelling

    Yes, I’m sure they do have insurance and they filed a claim to get it replaced after they refunded the money to the OP .

  • Maxwell Smart

    Totally irrelevant. You break something you pay.

    Oh i drank too much of your booze & accidentally trashed the room.

    Where are the tissues?

  • Lindabator

    never said it WAS a 5 star – but it is a nicer boutique with individually chosen items in those rooms, not just standard “motel” furnishings — which is why the cost is not the Walmart special for their furnishings

  • Maxwell Smart

    Trip advisor is one huge joke. Want an honest review ? Ask someone you know who’s been there.

  • S363

    She should pay for the lamp, as she broke it. But, as it was an accident, Radisson should charge her the real, actual, documented cost of a replacement. They should not profit from her misfortune.

  • BubbaJoe123

    Looking at the room pictures, I bet the broken lamp was one of the glass bedside table lamps that every room seems to feature. I suppose those could be $530 in wholesale quantities, but I’m still skeptical.

  • Kerr

    You think lamp replacement is a profit center for them?

  • Mel65

    So if I get in s car accident, even if it’s my fault, as long as the other person can afford it, I shouldn’t be held liable? After all, it was an accident, not an “on purpose”.

  • Mel65

    I just spent $800 for a lamp on clearance at Restoration Hardware. Originally it was almost $1300. For a lamp. For my home. I know I’m insane but it was lamp love at first sight. Having said that, it may have been difficult to match lamps/decor whatever which would hike the price.

  • Nathan Witt

    I’m not necessarily disagreeing with you, but if Radisson had come back with a $100 charge for the lamp, my guess is that this wouldn’t be a story on Chris’s site. If you came to my house and broke a wineglass, and I claimed that it was a very rare and valuable wineglass, and that I needed $300 from you to replace it, wouldn’t you, at the very least, want some evidence that I was telling the truth? And do you think I should bear any responsibility for hauling out my $300 wineglasses without consideration for who might be using them, or offering a warning about their excessive cost? While you’re quite right that intentionality is not an excuse, it’s also not right to gouge your paying guests for anything more than the actual cost of the damage, along with documentation substantiating your claim. And I can’t help but wonder why a business that’s so cost-conscious as to bill a customer (repeatedly) for a damaged lamp would be buying $540 x Rooms x Properties worth of lamps to begin with.

  • pauletteb

    When you figure in the probable deductible, it’s unlikely that the hotel recouped the full replacement cost.

  • pauletteb

    Kimball broke the lamp because she felt faint because SHE neglected to pay attention to her glucose level. In what universe is SHE not responsible and her son’s response ethical? I’m sorry the hotel caved.

  • C Schwartz

    Well this is in Vienna Austria and not the US — Even floor lamps from Ikea can cost over $100 in Austria. I think such things as lamps are more expensive there, the VAT (Sales tax) in Austria is around 20%. I think part of the issue is the cost of replacement of the lamp; whether the cost should is used or as you say depreciated value vs. replacement value is a good question.

  • C Schwartz

    I have traveled with a diabetic relative, and I cannot imagine letting them leave a hotel bar alone and return to a room without first getting them a glass of juice (orange was the preferred drink for my family).

  • cscasi

    “Reality check: The damage was her fault and she was responsible. But it was also an accident, and $540 seems like a lot to pay for a lamp.”
    So, if I have a vehicle accident by running my vehicle into a wall of the hotel, I should say, well, it is my fault but it was an accident and I think $3000 seems like a lot to pay for a few bricks? (just an example).
    Of course, I am sure it was an accident, buy normally hotels charge for damages caused and customers should be required to pay for the damages if they cause them. Consider deducting for normal wear and tear? How long had the lamp been in use in the room. What did it cost to replace (price, shipping, etc.). But, really, fair wear and tear is expected, but that does not coverage breakage.
    While I applaud the hotel for giving them back the money paid for breaking the lamp, it was not obligated to do so; especially after her son posted the negative reviews he did; that I am sure the hotel did not deserve. Some people are really “small minded”.

  • cscasi

    That’s not the point. Just because someone or some company has lots of money, it does not mean they should have to pay for damage others caused to their property. If hotels just let people do any and everything in its hotel rooms without holding them responsible, many nice hotels would soon become rundown one or no star places. I have seen too many people go in, have parties and tar up rooms or things like that. This was not the case here, but nonetheless people have ot be held responsible – even if the hotel finally agrees not to hold the guest(s) liable.

  • C Schwartz

    She did say that it was a floor lamp, there are some shiny silver ones in photos;

  • cscasi

    Really? I think a lot of travelers like nicely appointed rooms. Just because one has a lower end hotel does not mean it can’t or shouldn’t put nice things in its rooms. Guests appreciate that and it probably drives more guests to their hotels.
    Also, we do not know if the hotel gouging the guest for that lamp. I am sure if the guest asked for something to substantiate that cost, the hotel would provide it; at least reputable hoteliers would.

  • cscasi

    Probably, but what is your deductible? Also, you file a claim for something like that, what are the changes you might inherit an increase in your premiums for a time??

  • cscasi

    Then ask for something to substantiate that price. I am sure the hotel would accommodate you.

  • cscasi

    Well, perhaps staying in a tent would better; especially if one does not like nice appointments in one’s room; no matter the class of the hotel.

  • cscasi

    Perhaps you could research it on line and find out, if you are interested.

  • PsyGuy

    She was totally responsible for damaging the lamp. I wouldn’t have said anything, and if they tried to bill me deny it.

    That lamp was not worth $540, their cost was closer to $25 maybe $50 at most.

  • PsyGuy

    At $540, yes I do. Thats like those $120 robes that actually cost the hotel $8.

  • PsyGuy

    Agreed

  • PsyGuy

    The hotel bought those lamps in bulk at wholesale, it was nowhere near $540.

  • PsyGuy

    It didn’t cost $540 new, a commercial manufacturer, in bulk, at wholesale it was $25, maybe $50 tops.

  • PsyGuy

    Artistic doesnt mean pricey, especially when its pho-artsy. It’s just ceramic, a design, and a shade. The electrical part is pennies, the materials are a few dollars. It’s not an antique, at most it’s a signature line, but it’s still commercial furniture.

  • PsyGuy

    That $19.99 Walmart lamp cost $2 to manufacture. The Radisson lamp likely cost $25.

  • PsyGuy

    Glass is cheap, those lamps look nice but they are injection molded at a cost of a few dollars in materials.

  • BubbaJoe123

    You’re right, missed that.

  • BubbaJoe123

    Huh? Non sequitor.

  • C Schwartz

    There is so much that is unclear about the story. It watching a World Cup match would that mean 2014? In 2014 the Euro was high, it took about 1.32 dollars to buy a Euro, so would that mean the lamp was about 385 Euros? Ikea has floor lamps for Euro 119 now. Do hotels charge administrative fees for damage like car rentals (not that I agree with that)?

  • AAGK

    I agree with you on that. I don’t find the price of the lamp excessive at all. Lamps are expensive.

  • AAGK

    Why would anyone want to do that? The hotel can order one from their manufacturer.

    However the most famous hotel interior designers in the world, like Kelly Wearstler, often scour second hand marketplaces for antique furniture so that’s not unusual anyway.

  • Mel65

    That is exactly what I was thinking. Sure the lamp was used, but switching a light on and off shouldn’t cause a lot of depreciation and the hotel should be made whole. Like I said before, I just bought a lamp on clearance at Restoration Hardware and STILL paid $800, so I don’t think if the hotel bought specific lamps and had to go back and try to match them, that they’re asking an outrageous amount of money. I also find it despicable that the family shamed the hotel until it caved.

  • Mel65

    So, people shouldn’t be charged “as it was an accident’ but only if it’s intentional? We don’t know that they’re profiting, since it never got the the point where they needed to provide an invoice or something since the family shamed them into caving. I think the family profited here since they didn’t pay for damage THEY caused in the end.

  • S363

    I SAID she should pay, in my first sentence. But she should pay the actual cost of replacement (including for time spent by the hotel dealing with it). If they can show evidence (an invoice, a link to the product on a website, etc) that it was $540 she should pay that. I’m skeptical that the lamp actually cost that much. In Court, if one seeks damages, one must show some evidence of what the damages actually are, and this situation should be no different.

  • PsyGuy

    That’s retail, not commercial wholesale.

  • The Original Joe S

    There is no such thing as a $540 floor lamp in the Alpha Quadrant. That’s like the hogwash on TV where they tell you “This is a $75 value – absolutely FREEEEEE!” Sure….. I suspect that they are LYING about the cost of the lamp!!!!!!!!!!

  • The Original Joe S

    Protection!

  • The Original Joe S

    Yeah, Puke happens too! Blearrcccchhhh!

  • The Original Joe S

    From dirtbag mutual? Yup. First fender dent in 40 years, and they raised my rates. I’ll miss them….. NOT!

  • The Original Joe S

    Yeah, the liars said it was $540. I can get a gold-plated proctoscope for that much money! ha ha

  • The Original Joe S

    No, it conveys that the hotel was trying to GOUGE them $540 for a dollar-store lamp, and backed off like cockroaches scurrying off when the kitchen light comes on.

  • The Original Joe S

    lying about the replacement value.
    had a similar situation with a refrigerator in my apartment in Bangkok. My fault. Stupid. However, they’d told me that they could repair it, but then tried to hit me up for higher than retail cost for a replacement, inferior refrigerator. My friend the general came over and spoke with them. Amazing how reasonable they became.
    Epilogue: These same people embezzled a bundle of money from the building, and were then guests of the Crown at the Royal Thai Crossbar Arms Resort and Spa out in LakSi. Interesting thing about Thai slammers: they don’t feed you. If you don’t have someone to bring you food, you have a problem. Life expectancy in those places ain’t very good. Lesson: don’t behave poorly, and you won’t go to LakSi.

We want your feedback. Your opinion is important to us. Here's how you can share your thoughts:
  • Send us a letter to the editor. We'll publish your most thoughtful missives in our daily newsletter or in an upcoming post.
  • Leave a message on one of our social networks. We have an active Facebook page, a LinkedIn presence and a Twitter account. Every story on this site is posted on those channels. The conversation ranges from completely unmoderated (Twitter) to moderated (Facebook and LinkedIn).
  • Post a question to our help forums or ask our advocates for a hand through our assistance intake form. Please note that our help forum is not a place for debate. It's there primarily to assist readers with a consumer problem.
  • If you have a news tip or want to report an error or omission, you can email the site publisher directly. You may also contact the post's author directly. Contact information is in the author tagline.